Acute interstitial nephritis

immunologic and clinical aspects.

R. M. Ten, Vicente Torres, D. S. Milliner, T. R. Schwab, K. E. Holley, G. J. Gleich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acute interstitial nephritis is a common renal syndrome that may be associated with a variety of infections and drug therapies or may develop without an identified cause. Three cases are presented to illustrate the three types of acute interstitial nephritis--drug related, infection related, and idiopathic. Cell-mediated immune mechanisms seem to be more important than humorally mediated mechanisms in the pathogenesis of acute interstitial nephritis. Frequently, eosinophils are identified as a component of the interstitial cellular infiltrate, and eosinophiluria and eosinophilia have been claimed to be helpful in the diagnosis of acute interstitial nephritis, especially the drug-induced type. Neither eosinophiluria nor the presence of increased urinary levels of eosinophil major basic protein, however, is specific for the diagnosis of acute interstitial nephritis. Patients with drug-induced interstitial nephritis frequently have symptoms and signs suggestive of a hypersensitivity syndrome and rarely have more dramatic anaphylactic manifestations. Systemic glucocorticoids have been shown to be beneficial in this type of acute interstitial nephritis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)921-930
Number of pages10
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume63
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1988

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Interstitial Nephritis
Eosinophil Major Basic Protein
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Eosinophilia
Infection
Eosinophils
Glucocorticoids
Signs and Symptoms
Hypersensitivity
Kidney
Drug Therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ten, R. M., Torres, V., Milliner, D. S., Schwab, T. R., Holley, K. E., & Gleich, G. J. (1988). Acute interstitial nephritis: immunologic and clinical aspects. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 63(9), 921-930.

Acute interstitial nephritis : immunologic and clinical aspects. / Ten, R. M.; Torres, Vicente; Milliner, D. S.; Schwab, T. R.; Holley, K. E.; Gleich, G. J.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 63, No. 9, 09.1988, p. 921-930.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ten, RM, Torres, V, Milliner, DS, Schwab, TR, Holley, KE & Gleich, GJ 1988, 'Acute interstitial nephritis: immunologic and clinical aspects.', Mayo Clinic Proceedings, vol. 63, no. 9, pp. 921-930.
Ten RM, Torres V, Milliner DS, Schwab TR, Holley KE, Gleich GJ. Acute interstitial nephritis: immunologic and clinical aspects. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1988 Sep;63(9):921-930.
Ten, R. M. ; Torres, Vicente ; Milliner, D. S. ; Schwab, T. R. ; Holley, K. E. ; Gleich, G. J. / Acute interstitial nephritis : immunologic and clinical aspects. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 1988 ; Vol. 63, No. 9. pp. 921-930.
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