Activated charcoal as a potential radioactive marker for gastrointestinal studies

B. P. Mullan, M. Camilleri, Michael Camilleri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The scintigraphic measurement of colonic transit is currently performed using 111In ion exchange resin pellets delivered to the colon in a capsule coated with a pH sensitive polymer, methacrylate, which dissolves in the distal ileum. However, in the USA, this requires an investigational drug permit. Our aim was to evaluate the in vitro binding characteristics of activated charcoal in milieus that mimicked gastric and small intestinal content. The in vitro incubation of activated charcoal was performed with Na99TcmO4, 99Tcm-DTPA, 111InCl3, 111In-DTPA, 201TlCl and 67Ga-citrate in the pH range 2-4 and pH 7.2 at 37°C. We estimated the association of radiopharmaceuticals with the activated charcoal over a 3 h in vitro incubation. With the exception of 67Ga-citrate, the association of activated charcoal with the other radiopharmaceuticals was approximately 100% throughout the 3 h incubation. In conclusion, activated charcoal appears to adsorb avidly with common radioisotopes, and appears promising as an alternative to resin ion exchange pellets used for the measurement of gastrointestinal transit by scintigraphy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)237-240
Number of pages4
JournalNuclear Medicine Communications
Volume19
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1998

Fingerprint

Charcoal
Ion Exchange Resins
Pentetic Acid
Radiopharmaceuticals
Citric Acid
Gastrointestinal Transit
Investigational Drugs
Gastrointestinal Contents
Methacrylates
Ileum
Radioisotopes
Radionuclide Imaging
Capsules
Stomach
Polymers
Colon
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Activated charcoal as a potential radioactive marker for gastrointestinal studies. / Mullan, B. P.; Camilleri, M.; Camilleri, Michael.

In: Nuclear Medicine Communications, Vol. 19, No. 3, 1998, p. 237-240.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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