Acquired progressive ataxia and palatal tremor: Importance of MRI evidence of hemosiderin deposition and vascular malformations

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9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Oculopalatal tremor is frequently accompanied by progressive ataxia. In symptomatic oculopalatal tremor the ataxia frequently is delayed in onset. Progressive ataxia is a defining clinical feature of superficial siderosis. We report 5 cases with palatal tremor and ataxia. Four cases had evidence of intraparenchymal hemosiderin deposition on T2-gradient-echo imaging. Three cases had a brainstem vascular malformation. In two cases the hemosiderin deposition was likely due to prior trauma. The significance of these associations and possible similarities between ataxia related to superficial siderosis and ataxia and intraparenchymal hemosiderin is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)565-568
Number of pages4
JournalParkinsonism and Related Disorders
Volume17
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

Keywords

  • Ataxia
  • Hemosiderin
  • Palatal tremor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Neurology

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