Achieving the national health objective for influenza immunization

Success of an institution-wide vaccination program

K. L. Nichol, J. E. Korn, K. L. Margolis, G. A. Poland, R. A. Petzel, R. P. Lofgren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To enhance influenza vaccination rates for high-risk outpatients at the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) in Minneapolis, Minnesota, an institution-wide immunization program was implemented during 1987. Patients and methods: The program consisted of: (1) a hospital policy allowing nurses to vaccinate without a signed physician's order; (2) stamped reminders on all clinic progress notes; (3) a 2-week walk-in flu shot clinic; (4) influenza vaccination 'stations' in the busiest clinic areas; and (5) a mailing to all outpatients. Risk characteristics and vaccination rates for patients were estimated from a validated self-administered postcard questionnaire mailed to 500 randomly selected outpatients. For comparison, 500 patients were surveyed from each of three other Midwestern VAMCs without similar programs. Results: Overall, 70.6% of Minneapolis patients were high-risk and 58.3% of them were vaccinated. In contrast, 69.9% of patients at the comparison medical centers were high-risk, but only 29.9% of them were vaccinated. Conclusion: The Minneapolis VAMC influenza vaccination program was highly successful and may serve as a useful model for achieving the national health objective for influenza immunization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)156-160
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Medicine
Volume89
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Human Influenza
Immunization
Vaccination
Health
Outpatients
Veterans
Immunization Programs
Nurses
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Achieving the national health objective for influenza immunization : Success of an institution-wide vaccination program. / Nichol, K. L.; Korn, J. E.; Margolis, K. L.; Poland, G. A.; Petzel, R. A.; Lofgren, R. P.

In: American Journal of Medicine, Vol. 89, No. 2, 1990, p. 156-160.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nichol, K. L. ; Korn, J. E. ; Margolis, K. L. ; Poland, G. A. ; Petzel, R. A. ; Lofgren, R. P. / Achieving the national health objective for influenza immunization : Success of an institution-wide vaccination program. In: American Journal of Medicine. 1990 ; Vol. 89, No. 2. pp. 156-160.
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