Accuracy of single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with stents in native coronary arteries

James J. Milavetz, Todd D. Miller, David O. Hodge, David R. Holmes, Raymond J. Gibbons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Strategies to noninvasively evaluate patients after coronary stenting have not been evaluated. To determine the accuracy of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging in patients after coronary stenting, 209 patients who had undergone stenting followed by late stress SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging were evaluated. Quantitative coronary angiography was performed in 33 patients following SPECT imaging. SPECT restenosis was defined as a reversible or fixed defect within the stented vascular territory. Angiographic restenosis was examined using 2 definitions: total area narrowing ≤50% or ≤70% of the stent site or stented artery. The SPECT and angiographic findings were concordant in 22 of 33 stented vascular territories using the 50% definition of restenosis and in 29 of 33 stented territories using the 70% definition. Use of the 70% definition of restenosis resulted in improved accuracy of SPECT to detect a significant stenosis in the stented artery. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of SPECT were 95%, 73%, 88%, 89%, and 88% respectively. In patients with positive SPECT scans, the most significant stenosis in the stented artery was outside the stent site in 50% of cases. SPECT imaging appears to be accurate to predict significant stenosis in the stented artery, although the most severe stenosis is frequently distant from the stent site.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)857-861
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume82
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Accuracy of single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with stents in native coronary arteries'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this