Accuracy of colorectal polyp self-reports

Findings from the colon cancer family registry

Lisa Madlensky, Darshana Daftary, Terrilea Burnett, Patricia Harmon, Mark Jenkins, Judi Maskiell, Sandra Nigon, Kerry Phillips, Allyson Templeton, Paul John Limburg, Robert W. Haile, John D. Potter, Steven Gallinger, John A. Baron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Colorectal adenomas and other types of polyps are commonly used as end points or risk factors in epidemiologic studies. However, it is not known how accurately patients are able to self-report the presence or absence of adenomas following colonoscopy. Methods: Participants in the Colon Cancer Family Registry provided self-reports of recent colorectal cancer (CRC) screening activity, and whether or not they had ever been told they had a polyp. Positive and negative predictive values for polyp self-report were calculated by comparing medical records with self-reports from 488 participants. Results: The positive predictive value for self-reported polyp was 80.9%, and the negative predictive value was 85.8%. The predictive values did not differ by age group or sex, but participants with a previous diagnosis of CRC had a lower negative predictive value (76.2%) than participants with no personal history of CRC (89.0%; P = 0.04). Conclusions: Predictive values for self-reports of polyps are fairly high, but researchers needing accurate polyp data should obtain medical record confirmation. Pursuing medical records on only those participants self-reporting a polyp could result in an underestimation of the polyp prevalence in a study population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1898-1901
Number of pages4
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume16
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007

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Polyps
Colonic Neoplasms
Self Report
Registries
Medical Records
Colorectal Neoplasms
Adenoma
Colonoscopy
Early Detection of Cancer
Epidemiologic Studies
Age Groups
Research Personnel
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Madlensky, L., Daftary, D., Burnett, T., Harmon, P., Jenkins, M., Maskiell, J., ... Baron, J. A. (2007). Accuracy of colorectal polyp self-reports: Findings from the colon cancer family registry. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, 16(9), 1898-1901. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-0151

Accuracy of colorectal polyp self-reports : Findings from the colon cancer family registry. / Madlensky, Lisa; Daftary, Darshana; Burnett, Terrilea; Harmon, Patricia; Jenkins, Mark; Maskiell, Judi; Nigon, Sandra; Phillips, Kerry; Templeton, Allyson; Limburg, Paul John; Haile, Robert W.; Potter, John D.; Gallinger, Steven; Baron, John A.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 16, No. 9, 01.09.2007, p. 1898-1901.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Madlensky, L, Daftary, D, Burnett, T, Harmon, P, Jenkins, M, Maskiell, J, Nigon, S, Phillips, K, Templeton, A, Limburg, PJ, Haile, RW, Potter, JD, Gallinger, S & Baron, JA 2007, 'Accuracy of colorectal polyp self-reports: Findings from the colon cancer family registry', Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, vol. 16, no. 9, pp. 1898-1901. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-0151
Madlensky, Lisa ; Daftary, Darshana ; Burnett, Terrilea ; Harmon, Patricia ; Jenkins, Mark ; Maskiell, Judi ; Nigon, Sandra ; Phillips, Kerry ; Templeton, Allyson ; Limburg, Paul John ; Haile, Robert W. ; Potter, John D. ; Gallinger, Steven ; Baron, John A. / Accuracy of colorectal polyp self-reports : Findings from the colon cancer family registry. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2007 ; Vol. 16, No. 9. pp. 1898-1901.
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