Access to daylight and view in an office improves cognitive performance and satisfaction and reduces eyestrain: A controlled crossover study

Anja Jamrozik, Nicholas Clements, Syed Shabih Hasan, Jie Zhao, Rongpeng Zhang, Carolina Campanella, Vivian Loftness, Paige Porter, Shaun Ly, Selena Wang, Brent A Bauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Windows provide access to daylight and view, both of which have been linked to positive outcomes for occupants, including improved satisfaction, well-being, and performance. However, window access can also cause discomfort and eyestrain from glare. This controlled crossover study tested the occupant impacts of two modern shading systems designed to provide daylight and view while minimizing glare: windows with manually-controlled motorized mesh shades (Mesh Shades) and windows with automatic tinting (Dynamic Tint). Ten participants spent fourteen weeks working in a living lab in which three conditions were non-consecutively repeated for two-week periods: Mesh Shades, Dynamic Tint, and a baseline condition lacking daylight and view (Blackout Shades). Participants' cognitive function performance, satisfaction, and eyestrain in the baseline Blackout Shades condition were compared to the same measures in the Mesh Shades and Dynamic Tint conditions. Two aspects of cognitive function performance—Working Memory and Inhibition—improved in both the Mesh Shades and Dynamic Tint conditions. Satisfaction with light as well as with the overall environment improved in both the Mesh Shades and Dynamic Tint conditions. Eyestrain symptoms were reduced in both the Mesh Shades and Dynamic Tint conditions. There were no statistical differences between settings with Dynamic Tint and motorized Mesh Shades on measures of cognitive function performance, satisfaction, or eyestrain symptoms. This research demonstrates that providing access to daylight and view in an office environment using modern shading methods can improve occupants’ cognitive performance and satisfaction while reducing eyestrain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number106379
JournalBuilding and Environment
Volume165
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2019

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shading
baseline conditions
performance
Glare
working week
well-being
office
cause
Data storage equipment
method

Keywords

  • Cognitive function
  • Natural light
  • Office satisfaction
  • Performance
  • View quality
  • Window access

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Building and Construction

Cite this

Access to daylight and view in an office improves cognitive performance and satisfaction and reduces eyestrain : A controlled crossover study. / Jamrozik, Anja; Clements, Nicholas; Hasan, Syed Shabih; Zhao, Jie; Zhang, Rongpeng; Campanella, Carolina; Loftness, Vivian; Porter, Paige; Ly, Shaun; Wang, Selena; Bauer, Brent A.

In: Building and Environment, Vol. 165, 106379, 01.11.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jamrozik, Anja ; Clements, Nicholas ; Hasan, Syed Shabih ; Zhao, Jie ; Zhang, Rongpeng ; Campanella, Carolina ; Loftness, Vivian ; Porter, Paige ; Ly, Shaun ; Wang, Selena ; Bauer, Brent A. / Access to daylight and view in an office improves cognitive performance and satisfaction and reduces eyestrain : A controlled crossover study. In: Building and Environment. 2019 ; Vol. 165.
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