Abundant FUS-immunoreactive pathology in neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease

Manuela Neumann, Sigrun Roeber, Hans A. Kretzschmar, Rosa Rademakers, Matt Baker, Ian R.A. MacKenzie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

200 Scopus citations

Abstract

Neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease (NIFID) is an uncommon neurodegenerative condition that typically presents as early-onset, sporadic frontotemporal dementia (FTD), associated with a pyramidal and/or extrapyramidal movement disorder. The neuropathology is characterized by frontotemporal lobar degeneration with neuronal inclusions that are immunoreactive for all class IV intermediate filaments (IF), light, medium and heavy neurofilament subunits and α-internexin. However, not all the inclusions in NIFID are IF-positive and the primary molecular defect remains uncertain. Mutations in the gene encoding the fused in sarcoma (FUS) protein have recently been identified as a cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Because of the recognized clinical, genetic and pathological overlap between FTD and ALS, we investigated the possible role of FUS in NIFID. We found abnormal intracellular accumulation of FUS to be a consistent feature of our NIFID cases (n = 5). More neuronal inclusions were labeled using FUS immunohistochemistry than for IF. Several types of inclusions were consistently FUS-positive but IF-negative, including neuronal intranuclear inclusions and glial cytoplasmic inclusions. Double-label immunofluorescence confirmed that many cells had only FUS-positive inclusions and that all cells with IF-positive inclusions also contained pathological FUS. No mutation in the FUS gene was identified in a single case with DNA available. These findings suggest that FUS may play an important role in the pathogenesis of NIFID.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)605-616
Number of pages12
JournalActa neuropathologica
Volume118
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2009

Keywords

  • Frontotemporal dementia
  • Frontotemporal lobar degeneration
  • Fused in sarcoma
  • Neuronal intermediate filament disease
  • Translocated in liposarcoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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