Absolute risk of endometrial carcinoma during 20-year follow-up among women with endometrial hyperplasia

James V. Lacey, Mark E. Sherman, Brenda B. Rush, Brigitte M. Ronnett, Olga B. Ioffe, Máire A. Duggan, Andrew G. Glass, Douglas A. Richesson, Nilanjan Chatterjee, Bryan Langholz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

120 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The severity of endometrial hyperplasia (EH) - simple (SH), complex (CH), or atypical (AH) - influences clinical management, but valid estimates of absolute risk of clinical progression to carcinoma are lacking. Materials and Methods: We conducted a case-control study nested in a cohort of 7,947 women diagnosed with EH (1970-2002) at one prepaid health plan who remained at risk for at least 1 year. Patient cases (N = 138) were diagnosed with carcinoma, on average, 6 years later (range, 1 to 24 years). Patient controls (N = 241) were matched to patient cases on age at EH, date of EH, and duration of follow-up, and they were counter-matched to patient cases on EH severity. After we independently reviewed original slides and medical records of patient controls and patient cases, we combined progression relative risks (AH v SH, CH, or disordered proliferative endometrium [ie, equivocal EH]) from the case-control analysis with clinical censoring information (ie, hysterectomy, death, or left the health plan) on all cohort members to estimate interval-specific (ie, 1 to 4, 5 to 9, and 10 to 19 years) and cumulative (ie, through 4, 9, and 19 years) progression risks. Results: For nonatypical EH, cumulative progression risk increased from 1.2% (95% CI, 0.6% to 1.9%) through 4 years to 1.9% (95% CI, 1.2% to 2.6%) through 9 years to 4.6% (95% CI, 3.3% to 5.8%) through 19 years after EH diagnosis. For AH, cumulative risk increased from 8.2% (95% CI, 1.3% to 14.6%) through 4 years to 12.4% (95% CI, 3.0% to 20.8%) through 9 years to 27.5% (95% CI, 8.6% to 42.5%) through 19 years after AH. Conclusion: Cumulative 20-year progression risk among women who remain at risk for at least 1 year is less than 5% for nonatypical EH but is 28% for AH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)788-792
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 10 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Endometrial Hyperplasia
Endometrial Neoplasms
Prepaid Health Plans
Carcinoma
Endometrium
Hysterectomy
Medical Records
Case-Control Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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Absolute risk of endometrial carcinoma during 20-year follow-up among women with endometrial hyperplasia. / Lacey, James V.; Sherman, Mark E.; Rush, Brenda B.; Ronnett, Brigitte M.; Ioffe, Olga B.; Duggan, Máire A.; Glass, Andrew G.; Richesson, Douglas A.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Langholz, Bryan.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 28, No. 5, 10.02.2010, p. 788-792.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lacey, JV, Sherman, ME, Rush, BB, Ronnett, BM, Ioffe, OB, Duggan, MA, Glass, AG, Richesson, DA, Chatterjee, N & Langholz, B 2010, 'Absolute risk of endometrial carcinoma during 20-year follow-up among women with endometrial hyperplasia', Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 28, no. 5, pp. 788-792. https://doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2009.24.1315
Lacey, James V. ; Sherman, Mark E. ; Rush, Brenda B. ; Ronnett, Brigitte M. ; Ioffe, Olga B. ; Duggan, Máire A. ; Glass, Andrew G. ; Richesson, Douglas A. ; Chatterjee, Nilanjan ; Langholz, Bryan. / Absolute risk of endometrial carcinoma during 20-year follow-up among women with endometrial hyperplasia. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2010 ; Vol. 28, No. 5. pp. 788-792.
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title = "Absolute risk of endometrial carcinoma during 20-year follow-up among women with endometrial hyperplasia",
abstract = "Purpose: The severity of endometrial hyperplasia (EH) - simple (SH), complex (CH), or atypical (AH) - influences clinical management, but valid estimates of absolute risk of clinical progression to carcinoma are lacking. Materials and Methods: We conducted a case-control study nested in a cohort of 7,947 women diagnosed with EH (1970-2002) at one prepaid health plan who remained at risk for at least 1 year. Patient cases (N = 138) were diagnosed with carcinoma, on average, 6 years later (range, 1 to 24 years). Patient controls (N = 241) were matched to patient cases on age at EH, date of EH, and duration of follow-up, and they were counter-matched to patient cases on EH severity. After we independently reviewed original slides and medical records of patient controls and patient cases, we combined progression relative risks (AH v SH, CH, or disordered proliferative endometrium [ie, equivocal EH]) from the case-control analysis with clinical censoring information (ie, hysterectomy, death, or left the health plan) on all cohort members to estimate interval-specific (ie, 1 to 4, 5 to 9, and 10 to 19 years) and cumulative (ie, through 4, 9, and 19 years) progression risks. Results: For nonatypical EH, cumulative progression risk increased from 1.2{\%} (95{\%} CI, 0.6{\%} to 1.9{\%}) through 4 years to 1.9{\%} (95{\%} CI, 1.2{\%} to 2.6{\%}) through 9 years to 4.6{\%} (95{\%} CI, 3.3{\%} to 5.8{\%}) through 19 years after EH diagnosis. For AH, cumulative risk increased from 8.2{\%} (95{\%} CI, 1.3{\%} to 14.6{\%}) through 4 years to 12.4{\%} (95{\%} CI, 3.0{\%} to 20.8{\%}) through 9 years to 27.5{\%} (95{\%} CI, 8.6{\%} to 42.5{\%}) through 19 years after AH. Conclusion: Cumulative 20-year progression risk among women who remain at risk for at least 1 year is less than 5{\%} for nonatypical EH but is 28{\%} for AH.",
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T1 - Absolute risk of endometrial carcinoma during 20-year follow-up among women with endometrial hyperplasia

AU - Lacey, James V.

AU - Sherman, Mark E.

AU - Rush, Brenda B.

AU - Ronnett, Brigitte M.

AU - Ioffe, Olga B.

AU - Duggan, Máire A.

AU - Glass, Andrew G.

AU - Richesson, Douglas A.

AU - Chatterjee, Nilanjan

AU - Langholz, Bryan

PY - 2010/2/10

Y1 - 2010/2/10

N2 - Purpose: The severity of endometrial hyperplasia (EH) - simple (SH), complex (CH), or atypical (AH) - influences clinical management, but valid estimates of absolute risk of clinical progression to carcinoma are lacking. Materials and Methods: We conducted a case-control study nested in a cohort of 7,947 women diagnosed with EH (1970-2002) at one prepaid health plan who remained at risk for at least 1 year. Patient cases (N = 138) were diagnosed with carcinoma, on average, 6 years later (range, 1 to 24 years). Patient controls (N = 241) were matched to patient cases on age at EH, date of EH, and duration of follow-up, and they were counter-matched to patient cases on EH severity. After we independently reviewed original slides and medical records of patient controls and patient cases, we combined progression relative risks (AH v SH, CH, or disordered proliferative endometrium [ie, equivocal EH]) from the case-control analysis with clinical censoring information (ie, hysterectomy, death, or left the health plan) on all cohort members to estimate interval-specific (ie, 1 to 4, 5 to 9, and 10 to 19 years) and cumulative (ie, through 4, 9, and 19 years) progression risks. Results: For nonatypical EH, cumulative progression risk increased from 1.2% (95% CI, 0.6% to 1.9%) through 4 years to 1.9% (95% CI, 1.2% to 2.6%) through 9 years to 4.6% (95% CI, 3.3% to 5.8%) through 19 years after EH diagnosis. For AH, cumulative risk increased from 8.2% (95% CI, 1.3% to 14.6%) through 4 years to 12.4% (95% CI, 3.0% to 20.8%) through 9 years to 27.5% (95% CI, 8.6% to 42.5%) through 19 years after AH. Conclusion: Cumulative 20-year progression risk among women who remain at risk for at least 1 year is less than 5% for nonatypical EH but is 28% for AH.

AB - Purpose: The severity of endometrial hyperplasia (EH) - simple (SH), complex (CH), or atypical (AH) - influences clinical management, but valid estimates of absolute risk of clinical progression to carcinoma are lacking. Materials and Methods: We conducted a case-control study nested in a cohort of 7,947 women diagnosed with EH (1970-2002) at one prepaid health plan who remained at risk for at least 1 year. Patient cases (N = 138) were diagnosed with carcinoma, on average, 6 years later (range, 1 to 24 years). Patient controls (N = 241) were matched to patient cases on age at EH, date of EH, and duration of follow-up, and they were counter-matched to patient cases on EH severity. After we independently reviewed original slides and medical records of patient controls and patient cases, we combined progression relative risks (AH v SH, CH, or disordered proliferative endometrium [ie, equivocal EH]) from the case-control analysis with clinical censoring information (ie, hysterectomy, death, or left the health plan) on all cohort members to estimate interval-specific (ie, 1 to 4, 5 to 9, and 10 to 19 years) and cumulative (ie, through 4, 9, and 19 years) progression risks. Results: For nonatypical EH, cumulative progression risk increased from 1.2% (95% CI, 0.6% to 1.9%) through 4 years to 1.9% (95% CI, 1.2% to 2.6%) through 9 years to 4.6% (95% CI, 3.3% to 5.8%) through 19 years after EH diagnosis. For AH, cumulative risk increased from 8.2% (95% CI, 1.3% to 14.6%) through 4 years to 12.4% (95% CI, 3.0% to 20.8%) through 9 years to 27.5% (95% CI, 8.6% to 42.5%) through 19 years after AH. Conclusion: Cumulative 20-year progression risk among women who remain at risk for at least 1 year is less than 5% for nonatypical EH but is 28% for AH.

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