Absence of neurological deficits following extensive demyelination in a class I-deficient murine model of multiple sclerosis

Cynthia Rivera-Quiñones, Dorian McGavern, James D. Schmelzer, Samuel F. Hunter, Phillip Anson Low, Moses Rodriguez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

177 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Demyelination alone has been considered sufficient for development of neurological deficits following central nervous system (CNS) disease. However, extensive demyelination is not always associated with clinical deficits in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), the most common primary demyelinating disease in humans. We used the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus model of demyelination to investigate the role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II gene products in the development of functional and neurophysiological deficits following demyelination. We measured spontaneous clinical activity by two independent assays and recorded hind-limb motor-evoked potentials in infected class I- deficient and class II-deficient mice of an identical genetic background as well as in highly susceptible SJL/J mice. The results show that despite a similar distribution and extent of demyelinated lesions in all mice, only class I-deficient mice were functionally normal. We propose that the mechanism by which demyelinated class I-deficient mice maintain neurologic function results from increased sodium channel densities and the relative preservation of axons. These findings are the first to implicate a role for MHC class I in the development of neurological deficits following demyelination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-193
Number of pages7
JournalNature Medicine
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

Fingerprint

Demyelinating Diseases
Multiple Sclerosis
Sodium Channels
Bioelectric potentials
Neurology
Viruses
Assays
Genes
Major Histocompatibility Complex
Theilovirus
Motor Evoked Potentials
MHC Class II Genes
Specific Gravity
Central Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System
Axons
Extremities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Absence of neurological deficits following extensive demyelination in a class I-deficient murine model of multiple sclerosis. / Rivera-Quiñones, Cynthia; McGavern, Dorian; Schmelzer, James D.; Hunter, Samuel F.; Low, Phillip Anson; Rodriguez, Moses.

In: Nature Medicine, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1998, p. 187-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rivera-Quiñones, Cynthia ; McGavern, Dorian ; Schmelzer, James D. ; Hunter, Samuel F. ; Low, Phillip Anson ; Rodriguez, Moses. / Absence of neurological deficits following extensive demyelination in a class I-deficient murine model of multiple sclerosis. In: Nature Medicine. 1998 ; Vol. 4, No. 2. pp. 187-193.
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