Abnormalities in biomarkers of mineral and bone metabolism in kidney donors

Bertram L. Kasiske, Rajiv Kumar, Paul L. Kimmel, Todd E. Pesavento, Roberto S. Kalil, Edward S. Kraus, Hamid Rabb, Andrew M. Posselt, Teresa L. Anderson-Haag, Michael W. Steffes, Ajay K. Israni, Jon J. Snyder, Ravinder Jit Singh, Matthew R. Weir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous studies have suggested that kidney donors may have abnormalities of mineral and bone metabolism typically seen in chronic kidney disease. This may have important implications for the skeletal health of living kidney donors and for our understanding of the pathogenesis of long-term mineral and bone disorders in chronic kidney disease. In this prospective study, 182 of 203 kidney donors and 173 of 201 paired normal controls had markers of mineral and bone metabolism measured before and at 6 and 36 months after donation (ALTOLD Study). Donors had significantly higher serum concentrations of intact parathyroid hormone (24.6% and 19.5%) and fibroblast growth factor-23 (9.5% and 8.4%) at 6 and 36 months, respectively, as compared to healthy controls, and significantly reduced tubular phosphate reabsorption (-7.0% and -5.0%) and serum phosphate concentrations (-6.4% and -2.3%). Serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 concentrations were significantly lower (-17.1% and -12.6%), while 25-hydroxyvitamin D (21.4% and 19.4%) concentrations were significantly higher in donors compared to controls. Moreover, significantly higher concentrations of the bone resorption markers, carboxyterminal cross-linking telopeptide of bone collagen (30.1% and 13.8%) and aminoterminal cross-linking telopeptide of bone collagen (14.2% and 13.0%), and the bone formation markers, osteocalcin (26.3% and 2.7%) and procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (24.3% and 8.9%), were observed in donors. Thus, kidney donation alters serum markers of bone metabolism that could reflect impaired bone health. Additional long-term studies that include assessment of skeletal architecture and integrity are warranted in kidney donors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalKidney International
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 9 2016

Fingerprint

Minerals
Biomarkers
Tissue Donors
Kidney
Bone and Bones
Collagen
Serum
Phosphates
Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder
Calcitriol
Living Donors
Osteocalcin
Health
Bone Resorption
Collagen Type I
Parathyroid Hormone
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Osteogenesis
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • FGF23
  • Hyperparathyroidism
  • Mineral metabolism
  • Parathyroid hormone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Nephrology

Cite this

Kasiske, B. L., Kumar, R., Kimmel, P. L., Pesavento, T. E., Kalil, R. S., Kraus, E. S., ... Weir, M. R. (Accepted/In press). Abnormalities in biomarkers of mineral and bone metabolism in kidney donors. Kidney International. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.kint.2016.05.012

Abnormalities in biomarkers of mineral and bone metabolism in kidney donors. / Kasiske, Bertram L.; Kumar, Rajiv; Kimmel, Paul L.; Pesavento, Todd E.; Kalil, Roberto S.; Kraus, Edward S.; Rabb, Hamid; Posselt, Andrew M.; Anderson-Haag, Teresa L.; Steffes, Michael W.; Israni, Ajay K.; Snyder, Jon J.; Singh, Ravinder Jit; Weir, Matthew R.

In: Kidney International, 09.03.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kasiske, BL, Kumar, R, Kimmel, PL, Pesavento, TE, Kalil, RS, Kraus, ES, Rabb, H, Posselt, AM, Anderson-Haag, TL, Steffes, MW, Israni, AK, Snyder, JJ, Singh, RJ & Weir, MR 2016, 'Abnormalities in biomarkers of mineral and bone metabolism in kidney donors', Kidney International. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.kint.2016.05.012
Kasiske, Bertram L. ; Kumar, Rajiv ; Kimmel, Paul L. ; Pesavento, Todd E. ; Kalil, Roberto S. ; Kraus, Edward S. ; Rabb, Hamid ; Posselt, Andrew M. ; Anderson-Haag, Teresa L. ; Steffes, Michael W. ; Israni, Ajay K. ; Snyder, Jon J. ; Singh, Ravinder Jit ; Weir, Matthew R. / Abnormalities in biomarkers of mineral and bone metabolism in kidney donors. In: Kidney International. 2016.
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