Aberrant glycosylation of anchor-optimized MUC1 peptides can enhance antigen binding affinity and reverse tolerance to cytotoxic T lymphocytes

Latha B. Pathangey, Vani Lakshminarayanan, Vera J. Suman, Barbara A. Pockaj, Pinku Mukherjee, Sandra J. Gendler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cancer vaccines have often failed to live up to their promise, although recent results with checkpoint inhibitors are reviving hopes that they will soon fulfill their promise. Although mutation-specific vaccines are under development, there is still high interest in an off-the-shelf vaccine to a ubiquitous antigen, such as MUC1, which is aberrantly expressed on most solid and many hematological tumors, including more than 90% of breast carcinomas. Clinical trials for MUC1 have shown variable success, likely because of immunological tolerance to a self-antigen and to poor immunogenicity of tandem repeat peptides. We hypothesized that MUC1 peptides could be optimized, relying on heteroclitic optimizations of potential anchor amino acids with and without tumor-specific glycosylation of the peptides. We have identified novel MUC1 class I peptides that bind to HLA-A*0201 molecules with significantly higher affinity and function than the native MUC1 peptides. These peptides elicited CTLs from normal donors, as well as breast cancer patients, which were highly effective in killing MUC1-expressing MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Each peptide elicited lytic responses in greater than 6/8 of normal individuals and 3/3 breast cancer patients. The CTLs generated against the glycosylated-anchor modified peptides cross reacted with the native MUC1 peptide, STAPPVHNV, suggesting these analog peptides may offer substantial improvement in the design of epitope-based vaccines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number31
JournalBiomolecules
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2016

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • CTL
  • Heteroclitic antigen
  • Immunotherapy
  • Mucin1
  • Tn antigen
  • Vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Aberrant glycosylation of anchor-optimized MUC1 peptides can enhance antigen binding affinity and reverse tolerance to cytotoxic T lymphocytes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this