A survey of attendees at Native American health care conferences: Knowledge, attitudes, and practices about cigarette smoking

Marie M. Packer, Judith S Kaur, Felicia S. Hodge, Bin Nan, Mary A. Trapp, Marilyn A. Roubidoux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Cigarette smoking rates and related health consequences among Native Americans are the highest of any US ethnic group. Methods. A sample of the attendees at American Indian and Alaska Native health care conferences participated in a survey about cigarette smoking. Results. Of 162 respondents, 11.1% were current smokers, 7.5% of physicians were current smokers, and 80% were lifelong nonsmokers. The majority would ask a smoker to put out cigarettes and would not display ashtrays at home. Nearly all Native American physicians asked their patients about smoking and advised smokers to quit. Respondents were more likely to agree that smoking causes lung cancer (98.7%) as compared to knowing of the associations of smoking with cervical cancer (70.2%), depression (54.5%), and that it is more serious in women (55.2%; P < .01). Conclusions. Current smoking rates were low, and the physicians advised smokers to quit. However, there was less awareness about women's health problems that relate to cigarette smoking as compared to other health consequences of smoking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-95
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005

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Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
North American Indians
Smoking
Delivery of Health Care
Physicians
Surveys and Questionnaires
Health
Women's Health
Ethnic Groups
Tobacco Products
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Lung Neoplasms
Depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Oncology

Cite this

A survey of attendees at Native American health care conferences : Knowledge, attitudes, and practices about cigarette smoking. / Packer, Marie M.; Kaur, Judith S; Hodge, Felicia S.; Nan, Bin; Trapp, Mary A.; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.

In: Journal of Cancer Education, Vol. 20, No. 2, 06.2005, p. 89-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Packer, Marie M. ; Kaur, Judith S ; Hodge, Felicia S. ; Nan, Bin ; Trapp, Mary A. ; Roubidoux, Marilyn A. / A survey of attendees at Native American health care conferences : Knowledge, attitudes, and practices about cigarette smoking. In: Journal of Cancer Education. 2005 ; Vol. 20, No. 2. pp. 89-95.
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