A survey evaluating surgeons' pen- Operative usage of acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA) and their willingness to enroll their patients in a perioperative ASA randomized controlled trial

Rajesh Hiralal, Gordon Guyatt, Mohit Bhandari, Deborah Cook, Otavio Berwanger, Justin De Beer, Claudio Cina, Norm Buckley, Juan Carlos Villar, Victor Manuel Montori, Michael Marcaccio, James Paul, Laura Whiteacre, P. J. Devereaux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Purpose: Major cardiovascular complications associated with noncardiac surgery represent a substantial population health problem for which there are no established efficacious and safe prophylactic interventions. Acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA) represents a promising intervention. The objective of this study was to determine surgeons' perioperative usage of ASA, and if they would enroll their patients in a perioperative ASA randomized controlled trial (RCT). Methods: Cross-sectional survey of all practicing Canadian general, orthopedic, and vascular surgeons. Our mailed, self-administered survey asked surgeons to consider only their patients who were at risk of a major perioperative cardiovascular complication. Results: The response rate was 906/1854 (49%). For patients taking ASA chronically, there was marked variability regarding ASA continuation prior to surgery amongst the general and orthopedic surgeons, whereas 76%of vascular surgeons continued ASA in 81- l000% of their patients. For patients not taking ASA chronically, approaches to starting ASA prior to surgery were variable amongst the vascular surgeons, whereas 70% of general and 82%o of orthopaedic surgeons did not start ASA. For patients taking ASA chronically, 73% of general surgeons, 70% of orthopaedic surgeons, and 36% of vascular surgeons would allow at least 40% of their patients to participate in a perioperative RCT comparing stopping versus continuing ASA. For patients not taking ASA chronically, most general (760%), orthopaedic (670%), and vascular (510%) surgeons would allow at least 40% of their patients to participate in a perioperative RCT comparing starting ASA versus placebo. Conclusion: This national survey demonstrates that perioperative ASA usage as reported by surgeons is variable, identifying the need for, and community interest in, a large penoperative ASA trial.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical and Investigative Medicine
Volume33
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 2010

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Salicylic Acid
Randomized Controlled Trials
Blood Vessels
Surgeons
Surveys and Questionnaires
Orthopedics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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A survey evaluating surgeons' pen- Operative usage of acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA) and their willingness to enroll their patients in a perioperative ASA randomized controlled trial. / Hiralal, Rajesh; Guyatt, Gordon; Bhandari, Mohit; Cook, Deborah; Berwanger, Otavio; De Beer, Justin; Cina, Claudio; Buckley, Norm; Villar, Juan Carlos; Montori, Victor Manuel; Marcaccio, Michael; Paul, James; Whiteacre, Laura; Devereaux, P. J.

In: Clinical and Investigative Medicine, Vol. 33, No. 6, 12.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hiralal, R, Guyatt, G, Bhandari, M, Cook, D, Berwanger, O, De Beer, J, Cina, C, Buckley, N, Villar, JC, Montori, VM, Marcaccio, M, Paul, J, Whiteacre, L & Devereaux, PJ 2010, 'A survey evaluating surgeons' pen- Operative usage of acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA) and their willingness to enroll their patients in a perioperative ASA randomized controlled trial', Clinical and Investigative Medicine, vol. 33, no. 6.
Hiralal, Rajesh ; Guyatt, Gordon ; Bhandari, Mohit ; Cook, Deborah ; Berwanger, Otavio ; De Beer, Justin ; Cina, Claudio ; Buckley, Norm ; Villar, Juan Carlos ; Montori, Victor Manuel ; Marcaccio, Michael ; Paul, James ; Whiteacre, Laura ; Devereaux, P. J. / A survey evaluating surgeons' pen- Operative usage of acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA) and their willingness to enroll their patients in a perioperative ASA randomized controlled trial. In: Clinical and Investigative Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 33, No. 6.
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abstract = "Purpose: Major cardiovascular complications associated with noncardiac surgery represent a substantial population health problem for which there are no established efficacious and safe prophylactic interventions. Acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA) represents a promising intervention. The objective of this study was to determine surgeons' perioperative usage of ASA, and if they would enroll their patients in a perioperative ASA randomized controlled trial (RCT). Methods: Cross-sectional survey of all practicing Canadian general, orthopedic, and vascular surgeons. Our mailed, self-administered survey asked surgeons to consider only their patients who were at risk of a major perioperative cardiovascular complication. Results: The response rate was 906/1854 (49{\%}). For patients taking ASA chronically, there was marked variability regarding ASA continuation prior to surgery amongst the general and orthopedic surgeons, whereas 76{\%}of vascular surgeons continued ASA in 81- l000{\%} of their patients. For patients not taking ASA chronically, approaches to starting ASA prior to surgery were variable amongst the vascular surgeons, whereas 70{\%} of general and 82{\%}o of orthopaedic surgeons did not start ASA. For patients taking ASA chronically, 73{\%} of general surgeons, 70{\%} of orthopaedic surgeons, and 36{\%} of vascular surgeons would allow at least 40{\%} of their patients to participate in a perioperative RCT comparing stopping versus continuing ASA. For patients not taking ASA chronically, most general (760{\%}), orthopaedic (670{\%}), and vascular (510{\%}) surgeons would allow at least 40{\%} of their patients to participate in a perioperative RCT comparing starting ASA versus placebo. Conclusion: This national survey demonstrates that perioperative ASA usage as reported by surgeons is variable, identifying the need for, and community interest in, a large penoperative ASA trial.",
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AU - Hiralal, Rajesh

AU - Guyatt, Gordon

AU - Bhandari, Mohit

AU - Cook, Deborah

AU - Berwanger, Otavio

AU - De Beer, Justin

AU - Cina, Claudio

AU - Buckley, Norm

AU - Villar, Juan Carlos

AU - Montori, Victor Manuel

AU - Marcaccio, Michael

AU - Paul, James

AU - Whiteacre, Laura

AU - Devereaux, P. J.

PY - 2010/12

Y1 - 2010/12

N2 - Purpose: Major cardiovascular complications associated with noncardiac surgery represent a substantial population health problem for which there are no established efficacious and safe prophylactic interventions. Acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA) represents a promising intervention. The objective of this study was to determine surgeons' perioperative usage of ASA, and if they would enroll their patients in a perioperative ASA randomized controlled trial (RCT). Methods: Cross-sectional survey of all practicing Canadian general, orthopedic, and vascular surgeons. Our mailed, self-administered survey asked surgeons to consider only their patients who were at risk of a major perioperative cardiovascular complication. Results: The response rate was 906/1854 (49%). For patients taking ASA chronically, there was marked variability regarding ASA continuation prior to surgery amongst the general and orthopedic surgeons, whereas 76%of vascular surgeons continued ASA in 81- l000% of their patients. For patients not taking ASA chronically, approaches to starting ASA prior to surgery were variable amongst the vascular surgeons, whereas 70% of general and 82%o of orthopaedic surgeons did not start ASA. For patients taking ASA chronically, 73% of general surgeons, 70% of orthopaedic surgeons, and 36% of vascular surgeons would allow at least 40% of their patients to participate in a perioperative RCT comparing stopping versus continuing ASA. For patients not taking ASA chronically, most general (760%), orthopaedic (670%), and vascular (510%) surgeons would allow at least 40% of their patients to participate in a perioperative RCT comparing starting ASA versus placebo. Conclusion: This national survey demonstrates that perioperative ASA usage as reported by surgeons is variable, identifying the need for, and community interest in, a large penoperative ASA trial.

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