A study of peripheral input to and its control by post ganglionic neurones of the inferior mesenteric ganglion

J. H. Szurszewski, W. A. Weems

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intracellular recordings were made, in vitro, from neurones of guinea pig inferior mesenteric ganglia (IMG) attached, via the lumbar colonic nerves, to segments of distal colon. 'Spontaneous' synaptic input from colonic afferent fibres was observed in 79% of the neurones tested. In any given preparation, the level and pattern of this synaptic input to different neurones varied considerably. Superfusion of colonic segments with drugs (papaverine, isoprenaline and adenosine triphosphate) which reduce colonic motily decreased colonic afferent input to IMG neurones. Superfusion of colonic segments with acetylcholine or stimulation of pelvic nerves, both of which increase colonic motility, increased colonic afferent input to IMG neurones. Superfusion of colonic segments with either atropine or tubocurarine reduced the level of 'spontaneous', colonic afferent input. However, distension of these relaxed segments increased the colonic afferent input. Repetitive stimulation of preganglionic inputs to the IMG inhibited afferent input from drug relaxed segments of colon that were moderately distended by the injection of air into the lumen. Superfusion of the colon with phentolamine blocked this inhibition. The results of this study suggest that IMG neurones receive afferent input from mechanoreceptors located in the distal colon and that the mechanosensitivity of this afferent pathway is a part controlled by efferent noradrenergic neurones of the IMG. The IMG colon neural circuitry can therefore be considered to form a feed back control system which participates in the regulation of colonic motility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)541-556
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Physiology
Volume256
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1976
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ganglia
Neurons
Colon
Efferent Neurons
Afferent Pathways
Afferent Neurons
Adrenergic Neurons
Tubocurarine
Papaverine
Mechanoreceptors
Phentolamine
Atropine
Isoproterenol
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Acetylcholine
Guinea Pigs
Adenosine Triphosphate
Air
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

A study of peripheral input to and its control by post ganglionic neurones of the inferior mesenteric ganglion. / Szurszewski, J. H.; Weems, W. A.

In: Journal of Physiology, Vol. 256, No. 3, 1976, p. 541-556.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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