A score to identify patients with brain metastases from colorectal cancer who may benefit from whole-brain radiotherapy in addition to stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy

Dirk Rades, Liesa Dziggel, Oliver Blanck, Niklas Gebauer, Tobias Bartscht, Steven E. Schild

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aim: To design a tool to predict the probability of new cerebral lesions after stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy for patients with 1-3 brain metastases from colorectal cancer. Patients and Methods: In 21 patients, nine factors were evaluated for freedom from new brain metastases, namely age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), tumor type, number, maximum total diameter of all lesions and sites of cerebral lesions, extra-cranial metastases, and time from cancer diagnosis to irradiation. Results: Freedom from new lesions was positively associated with KPS of 90-100 (p=0.013); maximum total diameter ≤15 mm showed a trend for positive association (p=0.09). Points were assigned as: KPS 70-80=1 point, KPS 90-100=2 points, maximum diameter ≤15 mm=2 points and maximum diameter >15 mm=1 point. Six-month rates of freedom from new lesions were 29%, 45% and 100% for those with total scores of 2, 3 and 4 points, respectively, with corresponding 12-month rates of 0%, 45% and 100% (p=0.027). Conclusion: This study identified three risk groups regarding new brain metastases after stereotactic irradiation. Patients with 2 points could benefit from additional whole-brain radiotherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3111-3114
Number of pages4
JournalAnticancer Research
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

Keywords

  • Brain metastases
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy
  • New brain metastases
  • Prognostic score
  • Stereotactic radiosurgery
  • Whole-brain radiotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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