A review of electromyographic activation levels, timing differences, and increased anterior cruciate ligament injury incidence in female athletes

Timothy Hewett, B. T. Zazulak, G. D. Myer, K. R. Ford

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Deficits in dynamic neuromusculctr control of the knee may contribute to the higher incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in female athletes. There is evidence that neuromuscular training alters muscle firing patterns, as it decreases landing forces, improves balance, and reduces ACL injury incidence in female athletes. The purpose of this review is to summarise the evidence for altered muscular activation and timing relative to ACL injury risk in female athletes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-350
Number of pages4
JournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Athletes
Incidence
Knee
Muscles
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

A review of electromyographic activation levels, timing differences, and increased anterior cruciate ligament injury incidence in female athletes. / Hewett, Timothy; Zazulak, B. T.; Myer, G. D.; Ford, K. R.

In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 39, No. 6, 06.2005, p. 347-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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