A Retrospective Examination of the Similarity Between Clinical Practice and Manualized Treatment for Childhood Anxiety Disorders

Jennifer L. Vande Voort, Jana Svecova, Amy Brown Jacobson, Stephen P. Whiteside

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to facilitate the bidirectional communication between researchers and clinicians about the treatment of childhood anxiety disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder. Forty-four children were assessed before and after cognitive behavioral treatment with the parent versions of the Spence Child Anxiety Scale and Child Sheehan Disability Scale. In this retrospective study, treatment sessions were coded for the presence of exposures, relaxation, anxiety management, and behavior management. Results showed improved functioning within the clinical sample and suggested that treatment could be shorter, with exposure exercises implemented earlier in the course of treatment than described in manuals. Moreover, improvements in functioning were positively related to the use of exposures, and negatively related to the use of other anxiety management strategies. These results are discussed in the context of efforts to increase the availability of evidence-based treatments and are interpreted as supporting the development of more flexible treatment manuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)322-328
Number of pages7
JournalCognitive and Behavioral Practice
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

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