A prospective study of the impact of stress on quality of life

An investigation of low-income individuals with hypertension

S. C. Ames, G. N. Jones, J. T. Howe, P. J. Brantley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The role that major and minor life events play in the quality of life in low-income hypertensives was examined. Participants were randomly recruited from 2 primary care clinics at a public medical center. The study utilized a prospective design. Participants were determined to have hypertension and were being treated with antihypertensive medication prior to and throughout the duration of the study. Participants were administered the Life Experiences Survey and the Weekly Stress Inventory repeatedly during Year 1 to assess major and minor stress, respectively. Participants were repeatedly administered the RAND 36-Item Health Survey during Year 2 to assess quality of life. Usable data were obtained from 183 patients. Analyses revealed that major and minor stress were significant predictors of all measured domains of quality of life, even after age and number of chronic illnesses were statistically controlled. Minor stress contributed uniquely to the prediction of each dimension of quality of life even when age, number of chronic illnesses, and major life events were accounted for. Findings suggest that stress has a significant, persistent impact on the quality of life of low-income patients with established hypertension. These findings extend prior research that has examined the impact of medications on quality of life and suggest that stress needs to be accounted for as well.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)112-119
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume23
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Quality of Life
Prospective Studies
Hypertension
Chronic Disease
Life Change Events
Health Surveys
Psychological Stress
Antihypertensive Agents
Primary Health Care
Equipment and Supplies
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

A prospective study of the impact of stress on quality of life : An investigation of low-income individuals with hypertension. / Ames, S. C.; Jones, G. N.; Howe, J. T.; Brantley, P. J.

In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 23, No. 2, 2001, p. 112-119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ames, S. C. ; Jones, G. N. ; Howe, J. T. ; Brantley, P. J. / A prospective study of the impact of stress on quality of life : An investigation of low-income individuals with hypertension. In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine. 2001 ; Vol. 23, No. 2. pp. 112-119.
@article{672683e6d6684bf9a7c6264498c3f594,
title = "A prospective study of the impact of stress on quality of life: An investigation of low-income individuals with hypertension",
abstract = "The role that major and minor life events play in the quality of life in low-income hypertensives was examined. Participants were randomly recruited from 2 primary care clinics at a public medical center. The study utilized a prospective design. Participants were determined to have hypertension and were being treated with antihypertensive medication prior to and throughout the duration of the study. Participants were administered the Life Experiences Survey and the Weekly Stress Inventory repeatedly during Year 1 to assess major and minor stress, respectively. Participants were repeatedly administered the RAND 36-Item Health Survey during Year 2 to assess quality of life. Usable data were obtained from 183 patients. Analyses revealed that major and minor stress were significant predictors of all measured domains of quality of life, even after age and number of chronic illnesses were statistically controlled. Minor stress contributed uniquely to the prediction of each dimension of quality of life even when age, number of chronic illnesses, and major life events were accounted for. Findings suggest that stress has a significant, persistent impact on the quality of life of low-income patients with established hypertension. These findings extend prior research that has examined the impact of medications on quality of life and suggest that stress needs to be accounted for as well.",
author = "Ames, {S. C.} and Jones, {G. N.} and Howe, {J. T.} and Brantley, {P. J.}",
year = "2001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "112--119",
journal = "Annals of Behavioral Medicine",
issn = "0883-6612",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A prospective study of the impact of stress on quality of life

T2 - An investigation of low-income individuals with hypertension

AU - Ames, S. C.

AU - Jones, G. N.

AU - Howe, J. T.

AU - Brantley, P. J.

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - The role that major and minor life events play in the quality of life in low-income hypertensives was examined. Participants were randomly recruited from 2 primary care clinics at a public medical center. The study utilized a prospective design. Participants were determined to have hypertension and were being treated with antihypertensive medication prior to and throughout the duration of the study. Participants were administered the Life Experiences Survey and the Weekly Stress Inventory repeatedly during Year 1 to assess major and minor stress, respectively. Participants were repeatedly administered the RAND 36-Item Health Survey during Year 2 to assess quality of life. Usable data were obtained from 183 patients. Analyses revealed that major and minor stress were significant predictors of all measured domains of quality of life, even after age and number of chronic illnesses were statistically controlled. Minor stress contributed uniquely to the prediction of each dimension of quality of life even when age, number of chronic illnesses, and major life events were accounted for. Findings suggest that stress has a significant, persistent impact on the quality of life of low-income patients with established hypertension. These findings extend prior research that has examined the impact of medications on quality of life and suggest that stress needs to be accounted for as well.

AB - The role that major and minor life events play in the quality of life in low-income hypertensives was examined. Participants were randomly recruited from 2 primary care clinics at a public medical center. The study utilized a prospective design. Participants were determined to have hypertension and were being treated with antihypertensive medication prior to and throughout the duration of the study. Participants were administered the Life Experiences Survey and the Weekly Stress Inventory repeatedly during Year 1 to assess major and minor stress, respectively. Participants were repeatedly administered the RAND 36-Item Health Survey during Year 2 to assess quality of life. Usable data were obtained from 183 patients. Analyses revealed that major and minor stress were significant predictors of all measured domains of quality of life, even after age and number of chronic illnesses were statistically controlled. Minor stress contributed uniquely to the prediction of each dimension of quality of life even when age, number of chronic illnesses, and major life events were accounted for. Findings suggest that stress has a significant, persistent impact on the quality of life of low-income patients with established hypertension. These findings extend prior research that has examined the impact of medications on quality of life and suggest that stress needs to be accounted for as well.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035000691&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035000691&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 112

EP - 119

JO - Annals of Behavioral Medicine

JF - Annals of Behavioral Medicine

SN - 0883-6612

IS - 2

ER -