A Practical Guide to Biofeedback Therapy for Pelvic Floor Disorders

Susrutha Puthanmadhom Narayanan, Adil Eddie Bharucha

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Purpose of Review: Biofeedback therapy (BFT) is effective for managing pelvic floor disorders (i.e., defecatory disorders and fecal incontinence). However, even in controlled clinical trials, only approximately 60% of patients with defecatory disorders experienced long-term improvement. The review serves to update practitioners on recent advances and to identify practical obstacles to providing biofeedback therapy. Recent Findings: The efficacy and safety of biofeedback therapy have been evaluated in defecatory disorders, fecal incontinence, and levator ani syndrome. Recent studies looked at outcomes in specific patient sub-populations and predictors of a response to biofeedback therapy. Summary: Biofeedback therapy is effective for managing defecatory disorders, fecal incontinence, and levator ani syndrome. Patients who have a lower bowel satisfaction score and use digital maneuvers fare better. Biofeedback therapy is recommended for patients with fecal incontinence who do not respond to conservative management. A subset of patients with levator ani syndrome who have dyssynergic defecation are more likely to respond to biofeedback therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number21
JournalCurrent gastroenterology reports
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

Fingerprint

Pelvic Floor Disorders
Fecal Incontinence
Therapeutics
Defecation
Controlled Clinical Trials
Biofeedback (Psychology)
Safety

Keywords

  • Biofeedback therapy
  • Defecation disorder
  • Fecal incontinence
  • Levator ani syndrome
  • Pelvic floor dysfunction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

A Practical Guide to Biofeedback Therapy for Pelvic Floor Disorders. / Narayanan, Susrutha Puthanmadhom; Bharucha, Adil Eddie.

In: Current gastroenterology reports, Vol. 21, No. 5, 21, 01.05.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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