A population perspective on diabetes prevention: Whom should we target for preventing weight gain?

James P. Burke, Ken Williams, K. M Venkat Narayan, Cynthia Leibson, Steven M. Hafener, Michael P. Stern

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - To examine the influence of obesity and prevention of weight gain on the incidence of type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We examined participants in the San Antonio Heart Study, a prospective population-based study of Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites residing in San Antonio, Texas. BMI was stratified into four categories: normal (<25 kg/m2), overweight (≥25 kg/m2 and <30 kg/m 2), obese (≥30 kg/m2 and <35 kg/m2), and very obese (≥35 kg/m2). The number and proportion of incident cases prevented by targeting each BMI category were estimated. In addition, we calculated the decrease in risk of developing type 2 diabetes associated with weight gain prevention across both the BMI and age spectra. RESULTS - Preventing normal individuals from becoming overweight would result in the greatest reduction in incidence of type 2 diabetes. This would result in a 62 and 74% reduction in the incidence of type 2 diabetes in Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites, respectively. Preventing the entire population from gaining, on average, 1 BMI unit would result in a reduction in incidence of type 2 diabetes of 12.4 and 13.0% in Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites, respectively. CONCLUSIONS - The majority of cases of type 2 diabetes were in individuals who were overweight or mildly obese with a family history of type 2 diabetes. Public health resources should be directed toward the prevention of weight gain among normal and overweight individuals in order to prevent the maximum number of cases of type 2 diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1999-2004
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume26
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2003

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Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Weight Gain
Population
Incidence
Health Resources
Research Design
Public Health
Obesity
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Burke, J. P., Williams, K., Narayan, K. M. V., Leibson, C., Hafener, S. M., & Stern, M. P. (2003). A population perspective on diabetes prevention: Whom should we target for preventing weight gain? Diabetes Care, 26(7), 1999-2004. https://doi.org/10.2337/diacare.26.7.1999

A population perspective on diabetes prevention : Whom should we target for preventing weight gain? / Burke, James P.; Williams, Ken; Narayan, K. M Venkat; Leibson, Cynthia; Hafener, Steven M.; Stern, Michael P.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 26, No. 7, 01.07.2003, p. 1999-2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burke, JP, Williams, K, Narayan, KMV, Leibson, C, Hafener, SM & Stern, MP 2003, 'A population perspective on diabetes prevention: Whom should we target for preventing weight gain?', Diabetes Care, vol. 26, no. 7, pp. 1999-2004. https://doi.org/10.2337/diacare.26.7.1999
Burke, James P. ; Williams, Ken ; Narayan, K. M Venkat ; Leibson, Cynthia ; Hafener, Steven M. ; Stern, Michael P. / A population perspective on diabetes prevention : Whom should we target for preventing weight gain?. In: Diabetes Care. 2003 ; Vol. 26, No. 7. pp. 1999-2004.
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