A novel housing-based socioeconomic measure predicts hospitalisation and multiple chronic conditions in a community population

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Abstract

Background Socioeconomic status (SES) is an important predictor for outcomes of chronic diseases. However, it is often unavailable in clinical data. We sought to determine whether an individual housingbased SES index termed HOUSES can influence the likelihood of multiple chronic conditions (MCC) and hospitalisation in a community population. Methods Participants were residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, aged >18 years, who were enrolled in Mayo Clinic Biobank on 31 December 2010, with follow-up until 31 December 2011. Primary outcome was all-cause hospitalisation over 1 calendar-year. Secondary outcome was MCC determined through a Minnesota Medical Tiering score. A logistic regression model was used to assess the association of HOUSES with the Minnesota tiering score. With adjustment for age, sex and MCC, the association of HOUSES with hospitalisation risk was tested using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results Eligible patients totalled 6402 persons (median age, 57 years; 25th-75th quartiles, 45-68 years). The lowest quartile of HOUSES was associated with a higher Minnesota tiering score after adjustment for age and sex (OR (95% CI) 2.4 (2.0 to 3.1)) when compared with the highest HOUSES quartile. Patients in the lowest HOUSES quartile had higher risk of all-cause hospitalisation (age, sex, MCC-adjusted HR (95% CI) 1.53 (1.18 to 1.98)) compared with those in the highest quartile. Conclusions Low SES, as assessed by HOUSES, was associated with increased risk of hospitalisation and greater MCC health burden. HOUSES may be a clinically useful surrogate for SES to assess risk stratification for patient care and clinical research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)286-291
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Volume70
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

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Hospitalization
Social Class
Population
Logistic Models
Proportional Hazards Models
Patient Care
Chronic Disease
Multiple Chronic Conditions
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

@article{50583c2d9b034f57ad5f94d06309e060,
title = "A novel housing-based socioeconomic measure predicts hospitalisation and multiple chronic conditions in a community population",
abstract = "Background Socioeconomic status (SES) is an important predictor for outcomes of chronic diseases. However, it is often unavailable in clinical data. We sought to determine whether an individual housingbased SES index termed HOUSES can influence the likelihood of multiple chronic conditions (MCC) and hospitalisation in a community population. Methods Participants were residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, aged >18 years, who were enrolled in Mayo Clinic Biobank on 31 December 2010, with follow-up until 31 December 2011. Primary outcome was all-cause hospitalisation over 1 calendar-year. Secondary outcome was MCC determined through a Minnesota Medical Tiering score. A logistic regression model was used to assess the association of HOUSES with the Minnesota tiering score. With adjustment for age, sex and MCC, the association of HOUSES with hospitalisation risk was tested using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results Eligible patients totalled 6402 persons (median age, 57 years; 25th-75th quartiles, 45-68 years). The lowest quartile of HOUSES was associated with a higher Minnesota tiering score after adjustment for age and sex (OR (95{\%} CI) 2.4 (2.0 to 3.1)) when compared with the highest HOUSES quartile. Patients in the lowest HOUSES quartile had higher risk of all-cause hospitalisation (age, sex, MCC-adjusted HR (95{\%} CI) 1.53 (1.18 to 1.98)) compared with those in the highest quartile. Conclusions Low SES, as assessed by HOUSES, was associated with increased risk of hospitalisation and greater MCC health burden. HOUSES may be a clinically useful surrogate for SES to assess risk stratification for patient care and clinical research.",
author = "Takahashi, {Paul Y} and Euijung Ryu and Hathcock, {Matthew A.} and Olson, {Janet E} and Bielinski, {Suzette J} and Cerhan, {James R} and Jennifer Rand-Weaver and Juhn, {Young J}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1136/jech-2015-205925",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "70",
pages = "286--291",
journal = "Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health",
issn = "0143-005X",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "3",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - A novel housing-based socioeconomic measure predicts hospitalisation and multiple chronic conditions in a community population

AU - Takahashi, Paul Y

AU - Ryu, Euijung

AU - Hathcock, Matthew A.

AU - Olson, Janet E

AU - Bielinski, Suzette J

AU - Cerhan, James R

AU - Rand-Weaver, Jennifer

AU - Juhn, Young J

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Background Socioeconomic status (SES) is an important predictor for outcomes of chronic diseases. However, it is often unavailable in clinical data. We sought to determine whether an individual housingbased SES index termed HOUSES can influence the likelihood of multiple chronic conditions (MCC) and hospitalisation in a community population. Methods Participants were residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, aged >18 years, who were enrolled in Mayo Clinic Biobank on 31 December 2010, with follow-up until 31 December 2011. Primary outcome was all-cause hospitalisation over 1 calendar-year. Secondary outcome was MCC determined through a Minnesota Medical Tiering score. A logistic regression model was used to assess the association of HOUSES with the Minnesota tiering score. With adjustment for age, sex and MCC, the association of HOUSES with hospitalisation risk was tested using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results Eligible patients totalled 6402 persons (median age, 57 years; 25th-75th quartiles, 45-68 years). The lowest quartile of HOUSES was associated with a higher Minnesota tiering score after adjustment for age and sex (OR (95% CI) 2.4 (2.0 to 3.1)) when compared with the highest HOUSES quartile. Patients in the lowest HOUSES quartile had higher risk of all-cause hospitalisation (age, sex, MCC-adjusted HR (95% CI) 1.53 (1.18 to 1.98)) compared with those in the highest quartile. Conclusions Low SES, as assessed by HOUSES, was associated with increased risk of hospitalisation and greater MCC health burden. HOUSES may be a clinically useful surrogate for SES to assess risk stratification for patient care and clinical research.

AB - Background Socioeconomic status (SES) is an important predictor for outcomes of chronic diseases. However, it is often unavailable in clinical data. We sought to determine whether an individual housingbased SES index termed HOUSES can influence the likelihood of multiple chronic conditions (MCC) and hospitalisation in a community population. Methods Participants were residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, aged >18 years, who were enrolled in Mayo Clinic Biobank on 31 December 2010, with follow-up until 31 December 2011. Primary outcome was all-cause hospitalisation over 1 calendar-year. Secondary outcome was MCC determined through a Minnesota Medical Tiering score. A logistic regression model was used to assess the association of HOUSES with the Minnesota tiering score. With adjustment for age, sex and MCC, the association of HOUSES with hospitalisation risk was tested using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results Eligible patients totalled 6402 persons (median age, 57 years; 25th-75th quartiles, 45-68 years). The lowest quartile of HOUSES was associated with a higher Minnesota tiering score after adjustment for age and sex (OR (95% CI) 2.4 (2.0 to 3.1)) when compared with the highest HOUSES quartile. Patients in the lowest HOUSES quartile had higher risk of all-cause hospitalisation (age, sex, MCC-adjusted HR (95% CI) 1.53 (1.18 to 1.98)) compared with those in the highest quartile. Conclusions Low SES, as assessed by HOUSES, was associated with increased risk of hospitalisation and greater MCC health burden. HOUSES may be a clinically useful surrogate for SES to assess risk stratification for patient care and clinical research.

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U2 - 10.1136/jech-2015-205925

DO - 10.1136/jech-2015-205925

M3 - Article

VL - 70

SP - 286

EP - 291

JO - Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health

JF - Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health

SN - 0143-005X

IS - 3

ER -