A new interaction between SLC6A4 variation and child abuse is associated with resting heart rate

Gen Shinozaki, Magdalena Romanowicz, Simon Kung, David A. Mrazek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The short form of the indel promoter polymorphism (5HTTLPR) of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) and a history of child abuse have been reported to be associated with an increased risk for the development of depression. A child abuse history has also been associated with more rapid heart rate reactions. Methods: A retrospective chart review identified 282 patients with major depression who had been hospitalized and genotyped for the 5HTTLPR polymorphism. A subgroup of 185 females of European ancestry was also identified and analyzed. While hospitalized, heart rate was measured. Child abuse history was documented during the diagnostic evaluation. Analyses of the relationship between 5HTTLPR genotype, history of child abuse, and admission heart rate were conducted. Results: No main effect on heart rate from the 5HTTLPR genotype or a child abuse history was demonstrated for the entire sample or the subgroup of female patients. However, a genotype-by-abuse interaction was associated with resting heart rate on admission to the hospital (P<.05). Depressed patients, who were homozygous for the long allele and who had been abused, had a heart rate on hospital admission, which was statistically higher than patients with the same genotype but who had not been abused. These findings were consistent both for the 282 patients (7.2 bpm higher) as well as for the subgroup of 185 female patients of European ancestry (9.6 bpm higher). Conclusions: A 5HTTLPR genotype interaction of elevated heart rate with a history of child abuse was demonstrated in depressed psychiatric inpatients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-233
Number of pages7
JournalDepression and Anxiety
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

Fingerprint

Child Abuse
Heart Rate
Genotype
Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
Psychiatry
Inpatients
Alleles
Genes

Keywords

  • Child abuse
  • Depression
  • Gene-by-environment interaction
  • Heart rate
  • Serotonin transporter gene
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

A new interaction between SLC6A4 variation and child abuse is associated with resting heart rate. / Shinozaki, Gen; Romanowicz, Magdalena; Kung, Simon; Mrazek, David A.

In: Depression and Anxiety, Vol. 28, No. 3, 03.2011, p. 227-233.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shinozaki, Gen ; Romanowicz, Magdalena ; Kung, Simon ; Mrazek, David A. / A new interaction between SLC6A4 variation and child abuse is associated with resting heart rate. In: Depression and Anxiety. 2011 ; Vol. 28, No. 3. pp. 227-233.
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