A new era: Endoscopic tissue transplantation

Cadman Leggett, Emmanuel C. Gorospe, Lori Lutzke, Marlys Anderson, Kenneth Ke Ning Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To describe basic principles of tissue engineering with emphasis on the potential role of gastrointestinal endoscopy in regenerative medicine. RECENT FINDINGS: Stricturing associated with endoscopic submucosal resection and circumferential endoscopic mucosal resection can be prevented through transplantation of autologous epidermal cell sheets or seeded decellularized biological scaffolds. Lower esophageal sphincter augmentation through injection of muscle-derived cells is a novel potential treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease. Stem cell derived tissue has been used to repair injured colon in a mouse model of colitis. A bioengineered internal anal sphincter has been successfully implanted in mice and showed preserved functionality. SUMMARY: The immediate foreseeable application of tissue engineering in gastrointestinal endoscopy is in the field of mucosal repair after acute injury. Tissue regeneration can be achieved through expansion of autologous somatic cells or by induction of multipotent or pluripotent stem cells. Advances in cellular scaffolding have made bioengineering of complex tissues a reality. Tissue engineering in endoscopy is also being pioneered by studies looking at enteral sphincter augmentation and regeneration. The availability of engineered tissue for endoscopic application will increase with advances in cell-culturing techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)495-500
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Gastroenterology
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

Fingerprint

Tissue Transplantation
Tissue Engineering
Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
Regeneration
Multipotent Stem Cells
Bioengineering
Lower Esophageal Sphincter
Pluripotent Stem Cells
Regenerative Medicine
Autologous Transplantation
Anal Canal
Colitis
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Muscle Cells
Endoscopy
Small Intestine
Colon
Stem Cells
Injections
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • cellular scaffolds
  • gastrointestinal endoscopy
  • regenerative medicine
  • stem cells
  • tissue engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

A new era : Endoscopic tissue transplantation. / Leggett, Cadman; Gorospe, Emmanuel C.; Lutzke, Lori; Anderson, Marlys; Wang, Kenneth Ke Ning.

In: Current Opinion in Gastroenterology, Vol. 29, No. 5, 09.2013, p. 495-500.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Leggett, Cadman ; Gorospe, Emmanuel C. ; Lutzke, Lori ; Anderson, Marlys ; Wang, Kenneth Ke Ning. / A new era : Endoscopic tissue transplantation. In: Current Opinion in Gastroenterology. 2013 ; Vol. 29, No. 5. pp. 495-500.
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