A multi-institutional survey of internal medicine residents' learning habits

Randall S. Edson, Thomas J. Beckman, Colin Patrick West, Paul B. Aronowitz, Robert G. Badgett, David A. Feldstein, Mark C. Henderson, Joseph C. Kolars, Furman S. McDonald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Resident physicians are expected to demonstrate medical knowledge. However, little is known about the residents' reading habits and learning preferences. Aim: To assess residents' reading habits and preferred educational resources. Methods: Residents at five internal medicine training programs were surveyed regarding their reading and learning habits and preferences. Results: The majority (77.7) of residents reported reading less than 7 h a week. Most residents (81.4) read in response to patient care encounters. The preferred educational format was electronic; 94.6 of residents cited UpToDate® as the most effective resource for knowledge acquisition, and 88.9 of residents reported that UpToDate® was their first choice for answering clinical questions. Conclusions: Residents spent little time reading and sought knowledge primarily from electronic resources. Most residents read in the context of patient care. Future research should focus on strategies for helping resident physicians learn in the electronic age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)773-775
Number of pages3
JournalMedical Teacher
Volume32
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

Fingerprint

Internal Medicine
Habits
habits
Reading
Learning
medicine
resident
learning
Patient Care
Physicians
electronics
patient care
Surveys and Questionnaires
physician
Education
resources
knowledge acquisition
training program

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Edson, R. S., Beckman, T. J., West, C. P., Aronowitz, P. B., Badgett, R. G., Feldstein, D. A., ... McDonald, F. S. (2010). A multi-institutional survey of internal medicine residents' learning habits. Medical Teacher, 32(9), 773-775. https://doi.org/10.3109/01421591003692698

A multi-institutional survey of internal medicine residents' learning habits. / Edson, Randall S.; Beckman, Thomas J.; West, Colin Patrick; Aronowitz, Paul B.; Badgett, Robert G.; Feldstein, David A.; Henderson, Mark C.; Kolars, Joseph C.; McDonald, Furman S.

In: Medical Teacher, Vol. 32, No. 9, 09.2010, p. 773-775.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Edson, RS, Beckman, TJ, West, CP, Aronowitz, PB, Badgett, RG, Feldstein, DA, Henderson, MC, Kolars, JC & McDonald, FS 2010, 'A multi-institutional survey of internal medicine residents' learning habits', Medical Teacher, vol. 32, no. 9, pp. 773-775. https://doi.org/10.3109/01421591003692698
Edson RS, Beckman TJ, West CP, Aronowitz PB, Badgett RG, Feldstein DA et al. A multi-institutional survey of internal medicine residents' learning habits. Medical Teacher. 2010 Sep;32(9):773-775. https://doi.org/10.3109/01421591003692698
Edson, Randall S. ; Beckman, Thomas J. ; West, Colin Patrick ; Aronowitz, Paul B. ; Badgett, Robert G. ; Feldstein, David A. ; Henderson, Mark C. ; Kolars, Joseph C. ; McDonald, Furman S. / A multi-institutional survey of internal medicine residents' learning habits. In: Medical Teacher. 2010 ; Vol. 32, No. 9. pp. 773-775.
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