A model of jejunoileal in vivo neural isolation of the entire jejunoileum: Transplantation and the effects on intestinal motility

Michael G. Sarr, Judith A. Duenes, Masao Tanaka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of intestinal transplantation on enteric physiology have not been well studied. Our aim was to determine the effect of jejunoileal transplantation on patterns of small intestinal motility. To avoid confounding effects of immune rejection or immunosuppression, we developed a model of autotransplantation in which all tissue connections to the entire jejunoileum were transected at the base of the mesentery except for the superior mesenteric artery and vein which were stripped meticulously of investing adventitia. After 3 weeks, motility was studied in eight dogs with intestinal electrodes during fasting, after meals of 50 and 500 g of liver, and during intravenous infusions of pentagastrin and cholecystokinin. During fasting, the characteristic interdigestive migrating motor complex (MMC) was present in both the innervated duodenum and the "autotransplanted" jejunoileum; however, temporal coordination between the two regions was abolished. Feeding 50 g of liver abolished the MMC in the duodenum, but not in the jejunoileum; in contrast, 500 g of liver interrupted the MMC in both regions. Exogenous pentagastrin and cholecystokinin inhibited the MMC for the duration of the infusions. These findings suggest that extrinsic nerves and/or intrinsic (enteric) myoneural continuity do not initiate fasting motor patterns in the jejunoileum but do regulate the temporal coordination of motor patterns between segments of small intestine. Postprandial inhibition of the MMC is only in part mediated by neural factors. After transplantation, motility is abnormal; the overall effects on enteric physiology remain unknown.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)266-272
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989

Fingerprint

Migrating Myoelectric Complexes
Gastrointestinal Motility
Transplantation
Fasting
Pentagastrin
Cholecystokinin
Duodenum
Liver
Mesenteric Veins
Adventitia
Mesentery
Superior Mesenteric Artery
Autologous Transplantation
Intravenous Infusions
Immunosuppression
Small Intestine
Meals
Electrodes
Dogs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

A model of jejunoileal in vivo neural isolation of the entire jejunoileum : Transplantation and the effects on intestinal motility. / Sarr, Michael G.; Duenes, Judith A.; Tanaka, Masao.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 47, No. 3, 1989, p. 266-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4cae55c8728d4d7485eae872cbd23db2,
title = "A model of jejunoileal in vivo neural isolation of the entire jejunoileum: Transplantation and the effects on intestinal motility",
abstract = "The effects of intestinal transplantation on enteric physiology have not been well studied. Our aim was to determine the effect of jejunoileal transplantation on patterns of small intestinal motility. To avoid confounding effects of immune rejection or immunosuppression, we developed a model of autotransplantation in which all tissue connections to the entire jejunoileum were transected at the base of the mesentery except for the superior mesenteric artery and vein which were stripped meticulously of investing adventitia. After 3 weeks, motility was studied in eight dogs with intestinal electrodes during fasting, after meals of 50 and 500 g of liver, and during intravenous infusions of pentagastrin and cholecystokinin. During fasting, the characteristic interdigestive migrating motor complex (MMC) was present in both the innervated duodenum and the {"}autotransplanted{"} jejunoileum; however, temporal coordination between the two regions was abolished. Feeding 50 g of liver abolished the MMC in the duodenum, but not in the jejunoileum; in contrast, 500 g of liver interrupted the MMC in both regions. Exogenous pentagastrin and cholecystokinin inhibited the MMC for the duration of the infusions. These findings suggest that extrinsic nerves and/or intrinsic (enteric) myoneural continuity do not initiate fasting motor patterns in the jejunoileum but do regulate the temporal coordination of motor patterns between segments of small intestine. Postprandial inhibition of the MMC is only in part mediated by neural factors. After transplantation, motility is abnormal; the overall effects on enteric physiology remain unknown.",
author = "Sarr, {Michael G.} and Duenes, {Judith A.} and Masao Tanaka",
year = "1989",
doi = "10.1016/0022-4804(89)90119-4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "47",
pages = "266--272",
journal = "Journal of Surgical Research",
issn = "0022-4804",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A model of jejunoileal in vivo neural isolation of the entire jejunoileum

T2 - Transplantation and the effects on intestinal motility

AU - Sarr, Michael G.

AU - Duenes, Judith A.

AU - Tanaka, Masao

PY - 1989

Y1 - 1989

N2 - The effects of intestinal transplantation on enteric physiology have not been well studied. Our aim was to determine the effect of jejunoileal transplantation on patterns of small intestinal motility. To avoid confounding effects of immune rejection or immunosuppression, we developed a model of autotransplantation in which all tissue connections to the entire jejunoileum were transected at the base of the mesentery except for the superior mesenteric artery and vein which were stripped meticulously of investing adventitia. After 3 weeks, motility was studied in eight dogs with intestinal electrodes during fasting, after meals of 50 and 500 g of liver, and during intravenous infusions of pentagastrin and cholecystokinin. During fasting, the characteristic interdigestive migrating motor complex (MMC) was present in both the innervated duodenum and the "autotransplanted" jejunoileum; however, temporal coordination between the two regions was abolished. Feeding 50 g of liver abolished the MMC in the duodenum, but not in the jejunoileum; in contrast, 500 g of liver interrupted the MMC in both regions. Exogenous pentagastrin and cholecystokinin inhibited the MMC for the duration of the infusions. These findings suggest that extrinsic nerves and/or intrinsic (enteric) myoneural continuity do not initiate fasting motor patterns in the jejunoileum but do regulate the temporal coordination of motor patterns between segments of small intestine. Postprandial inhibition of the MMC is only in part mediated by neural factors. After transplantation, motility is abnormal; the overall effects on enteric physiology remain unknown.

AB - The effects of intestinal transplantation on enteric physiology have not been well studied. Our aim was to determine the effect of jejunoileal transplantation on patterns of small intestinal motility. To avoid confounding effects of immune rejection or immunosuppression, we developed a model of autotransplantation in which all tissue connections to the entire jejunoileum were transected at the base of the mesentery except for the superior mesenteric artery and vein which were stripped meticulously of investing adventitia. After 3 weeks, motility was studied in eight dogs with intestinal electrodes during fasting, after meals of 50 and 500 g of liver, and during intravenous infusions of pentagastrin and cholecystokinin. During fasting, the characteristic interdigestive migrating motor complex (MMC) was present in both the innervated duodenum and the "autotransplanted" jejunoileum; however, temporal coordination between the two regions was abolished. Feeding 50 g of liver abolished the MMC in the duodenum, but not in the jejunoileum; in contrast, 500 g of liver interrupted the MMC in both regions. Exogenous pentagastrin and cholecystokinin inhibited the MMC for the duration of the infusions. These findings suggest that extrinsic nerves and/or intrinsic (enteric) myoneural continuity do not initiate fasting motor patterns in the jejunoileum but do regulate the temporal coordination of motor patterns between segments of small intestine. Postprandial inhibition of the MMC is only in part mediated by neural factors. After transplantation, motility is abnormal; the overall effects on enteric physiology remain unknown.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024441741&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024441741&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0022-4804(89)90119-4

DO - 10.1016/0022-4804(89)90119-4

M3 - Article

C2 - 2770285

AN - SCOPUS:0024441741

VL - 47

SP - 266

EP - 272

JO - Journal of Surgical Research

JF - Journal of Surgical Research

SN - 0022-4804

IS - 3

ER -