A model of food-borne Listeria monocytogenes infection in the Sprague-Dawley rat using gastric inoculation: development and effect of gastric acidity on infective dose

Walter F. Schlech, Daniel P. Chase, Andrew David Badley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a food-borne pathogen in humans. A model of LM infection was developed using the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat to study the interaction of LM with gastrointestinal epithelium as the first step in the pathogenesis of invasive listeriosis. Conventionally raised, juvenile female SD rats were given 102-109 virulent L. monocytogenes, serotype 4b or nonpathogenic Listeria species. Only rats given virulent LM developed dose-dependent invasive infection of the liver and spleen. Light and electron microscopic studies suggested attachment to and invasion of the gastrointestinal mucosa by virulent LM. Because the development of invasive listeriosis in humans has been epidemiologically associated with a decrease in gastric acidity, the effect of decreasing gastric acidity on dose-dependent infection was studied. Rats were pretreated with cimetidine (50 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection prior to oral inoculation of 102-109 virulent L. monocytogenes. Cimetidine significantly lowered the infective dose of virulent L. monocytogenes (P<0.05). This oral model should allow further study of host and organism-specific virulence factors mediating the gastrointestinal phase of invasive LM infection, an increasingly important public health problem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-24
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Food Microbiology
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Listeriosis
Listeria monocytogenes
Sprague Dawley Rats
acidity
Stomach
stomach
vaccination
Food
rats
dosage
infection
cimetidine
listeriosis
Cimetidine
Listeria
Virulence Factors
food pathogens
intraperitoneal injection
Infection
Intraperitoneal Injections

Keywords

  • Gastric acidity
  • Gastrointestinal mucosa
  • Invasion
  • Listeria monocytogenes
  • Virulence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Microbiology

Cite this

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abstract = "Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a food-borne pathogen in humans. A model of LM infection was developed using the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat to study the interaction of LM with gastrointestinal epithelium as the first step in the pathogenesis of invasive listeriosis. Conventionally raised, juvenile female SD rats were given 102-109 virulent L. monocytogenes, serotype 4b or nonpathogenic Listeria species. Only rats given virulent LM developed dose-dependent invasive infection of the liver and spleen. Light and electron microscopic studies suggested attachment to and invasion of the gastrointestinal mucosa by virulent LM. Because the development of invasive listeriosis in humans has been epidemiologically associated with a decrease in gastric acidity, the effect of decreasing gastric acidity on dose-dependent infection was studied. Rats were pretreated with cimetidine (50 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection prior to oral inoculation of 102-109 virulent L. monocytogenes. Cimetidine significantly lowered the infective dose of virulent L. monocytogenes (P<0.05). This oral model should allow further study of host and organism-specific virulence factors mediating the gastrointestinal phase of invasive LM infection, an increasingly important public health problem.",
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AU - Chase, Daniel P.

AU - Badley, Andrew David

PY - 1993

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AB - Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a food-borne pathogen in humans. A model of LM infection was developed using the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat to study the interaction of LM with gastrointestinal epithelium as the first step in the pathogenesis of invasive listeriosis. Conventionally raised, juvenile female SD rats were given 102-109 virulent L. monocytogenes, serotype 4b or nonpathogenic Listeria species. Only rats given virulent LM developed dose-dependent invasive infection of the liver and spleen. Light and electron microscopic studies suggested attachment to and invasion of the gastrointestinal mucosa by virulent LM. Because the development of invasive listeriosis in humans has been epidemiologically associated with a decrease in gastric acidity, the effect of decreasing gastric acidity on dose-dependent infection was studied. Rats were pretreated with cimetidine (50 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection prior to oral inoculation of 102-109 virulent L. monocytogenes. Cimetidine significantly lowered the infective dose of virulent L. monocytogenes (P<0.05). This oral model should allow further study of host and organism-specific virulence factors mediating the gastrointestinal phase of invasive LM infection, an increasingly important public health problem.

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