A matter of race: Early-versus late-stage cancer diagnosis

Beth A. Virnig, Nancy N. Baxter, Elizabeth B Habermann, Roger D. Feldman, Cathy J. Bradley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We compared the stage at which cancer is diagnosed and survival rates between African Americans and whites, for thirty-four solid tumors, using the population-based Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database. Whites were diagnosed at earlier stages than African Americans for thirty-one of the thirty-four tumor sites. Whites were significantly more likely than blacks to survive five years for twenty-six tumor sites; no cancer site had significantly superior survival among African Americans. These differences cannot be explained by screening behavior or risk factors; they point instead to the need for broad-based strategies to remedy racial inequality in cancer survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)160-168
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009
Externally publishedYes

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African Americans
Neoplasms
Population Surveillance
Epidemiology
Survival Rate
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Virnig, B. A., Baxter, N. N., Habermann, E. B., Feldman, R. D., & Bradley, C. J. (2009). A matter of race: Early-versus late-stage cancer diagnosis. Health Affairs, 28(1), 160-168. https://doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.28.1.160

A matter of race : Early-versus late-stage cancer diagnosis. / Virnig, Beth A.; Baxter, Nancy N.; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Feldman, Roger D.; Bradley, Cathy J.

In: Health Affairs, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.2009, p. 160-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Virnig, BA, Baxter, NN, Habermann, EB, Feldman, RD & Bradley, CJ 2009, 'A matter of race: Early-versus late-stage cancer diagnosis', Health Affairs, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 160-168. https://doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.28.1.160
Virnig, Beth A. ; Baxter, Nancy N. ; Habermann, Elizabeth B ; Feldman, Roger D. ; Bradley, Cathy J. / A matter of race : Early-versus late-stage cancer diagnosis. In: Health Affairs. 2009 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 160-168.
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