A major role for carbon monoxide as an endogenous hyperpolarizing factor in the gastrointestinal tract

Gianrico Farrugia, Sha Lei, Xue Lin, Steven M. Miller, Karl A Nath, Christopher D. Ferris, Michael Levitt, Joseph H. Szurszewski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Carbon monoxide (CO) is proposed as a physiological messenger. CO activates cGMP and has a direct effect on potassium channels. Both actions of CO lead to hyperpolarization of a cell's resting membrane potential, suggesting that CO may function as a hyperpolarizing factor, although direct evidence is still lacking. Here we take advantage of the known membrane potential gradient that exists in the muscle layers of the gastrointestinal tract to determine whether CO is an endogenous hyperpolarizing factor. We find that heme oxygenase-2-null mice have depolarized smooth muscle cells and that the membrane potential gradient in the gut is abolished. Exogenous CO hyperpolarizes the membrane potential. Regions of the canine gastrointestinal tract that are more hyperpolarized generate more CO and have higher heme oxygenase activity than more depolarized regions. Our results suggest that CO is a critical hyperpolarizing factor required for the maintenance of intestinal smooth muscle membrane potential and gradient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8567-8570
Number of pages4
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume100
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 8 2003

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Carbon Monoxide
Gastrointestinal Tract
Membrane Potentials
Cell Membrane
Heme Oxygenase (Decyclizing)
Potassium Channels
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Smooth Muscle
Canidae
Maintenance
Muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

A major role for carbon monoxide as an endogenous hyperpolarizing factor in the gastrointestinal tract. / Farrugia, Gianrico; Lei, Sha; Lin, Xue; Miller, Steven M.; Nath, Karl A; Ferris, Christopher D.; Levitt, Michael; Szurszewski, Joseph H.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 100, No. 14, 08.07.2003, p. 8567-8570.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Farrugia, Gianrico ; Lei, Sha ; Lin, Xue ; Miller, Steven M. ; Nath, Karl A ; Ferris, Christopher D. ; Levitt, Michael ; Szurszewski, Joseph H. / A major role for carbon monoxide as an endogenous hyperpolarizing factor in the gastrointestinal tract. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2003 ; Vol. 100, No. 14. pp. 8567-8570.
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AU - Levitt, Michael

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