A lifetime of hypercalcemia and hypercalciuria, finally explained

Thomas P. Jacobs, Martin Kaufman, Glenville Jones, Rajiv Kumar, Karl Peter Schlingmann, Sue Shapses, John P. Bilezikian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, and recurrent nephrolithiasis are all common clinical problems. This case report illustrates a newly described but possibly not uncommon cause of this presenting complex. Objective: We report on a patient studied for over 30 years, with the diagnosis finally made with modern biochemical and genetic tools. Design and Setting: This study consists of a case report and review of literature conducted in a University Referral Center. Patient and Intervention: A single patient with hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, and recurrent nephrolithiasis was treated with low-calcium diet, low vitamin D intake, prednisone, and ketoconazole. Main Outcome Measure: We measured the patient's clinical and biochemical response to interventions above. Results: Calcium absorption measured by dual isotope absorptiometry was elevated at 37.4%. Serum levels of 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were very low, as measured in two laboratories (0.62 ng/mL [normal, 3.49 ± 1.57], and 0.18 mg/mL). Genetic analysis of CYP24A1 revealed homozygous mutation E143del previously described. The patient's serum calcium and renal function improved markedly on treatment with ketoconazole but not with prednisone. Conclusions: Chronic hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, and/or nephrolithiasis may be caused by mutations in CYP24A1 causing failure to metabolize 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)708-712
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume99
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Hypercalciuria
Hypercalcemia
Ketoconazole
Nephrolithiasis
Prednisone
Calcium
Dihydroxycholecalciferols
Nutrition
Vitamin D
Isotopes
Mutation
Serum
Molecular Biology
Referral and Consultation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Diet
Kidney
Vitamin D3 24-Hydroxylase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Jacobs, T. P., Kaufman, M., Jones, G., Kumar, R., Schlingmann, K. P., Shapses, S., & Bilezikian, J. P. (2014). A lifetime of hypercalcemia and hypercalciuria, finally explained. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 99(3), 708-712. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2013-3802

A lifetime of hypercalcemia and hypercalciuria, finally explained. / Jacobs, Thomas P.; Kaufman, Martin; Jones, Glenville; Kumar, Rajiv; Schlingmann, Karl Peter; Shapses, Sue; Bilezikian, John P.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 99, No. 3, 2014, p. 708-712.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jacobs, TP, Kaufman, M, Jones, G, Kumar, R, Schlingmann, KP, Shapses, S & Bilezikian, JP 2014, 'A lifetime of hypercalcemia and hypercalciuria, finally explained', Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 99, no. 3, pp. 708-712. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2013-3802
Jacobs, Thomas P. ; Kaufman, Martin ; Jones, Glenville ; Kumar, Rajiv ; Schlingmann, Karl Peter ; Shapses, Sue ; Bilezikian, John P. / A lifetime of hypercalcemia and hypercalciuria, finally explained. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2014 ; Vol. 99, No. 3. pp. 708-712.
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