A historical prospective cohort study of carotid artery stenosis after radiotherapy for head and neck malignancies

Paul D. Brown, Robert L. Foote, Mark P. McLaughlin, Michele Y. Halyard, Karla V. Ballman, A. Craig Collie, Robert C. Miller, Kelly Flemming, John W. Hallett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To determine carotid artery stenosis incidence after radiotherapy for head-and-neck neoplasms. Methods and Materials: This historical prospective cohort study comprised 44 head-and-neck cancer survivors who received unilateral neck radiotherapy between 1974 and 1999. They underwent bilateral carotid duplex ultrasonography to detect carotid artery stenosis. Results: The incidence of significant carotid stenosis (8 of 44 [18%]) in the irradiated neck was higher than that in the contralateral unirradiated neck (3 of 44 [7%]), although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.13). The rate of significant carotid stenosis events increased as the time after radiotherapy increased. The risk of ipsilateral carotid artery stenosis was higher in patients who had undergone a neck dissection vs. those who had not. Patients with significant ipsilateral stenosis also tended to be older than those without significant stenosis. No other patient or treatment variables correlated with risk of carotid artery stenosis. Conclusions: For long-term survivors after neck dissection and irradiation, especially those who are symptomatic, ultrasonographic carotid artery screening should be considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1361-1367
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Volume63
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

Fingerprint

Carotid Stenosis
arteries
radiation therapy
Cohort Studies
Neck
Radiotherapy
Head
Prospective Studies
Neoplasms
Neck Dissection
dissection
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Survivors
Pathologic Constriction
incidence
Incidence
neoplasms
Carotid Arteries
Ultrasonography
screening

Keywords

  • Carotid artery stenosis
  • Head and neck cancer
  • Radiotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiation

Cite this

A historical prospective cohort study of carotid artery stenosis after radiotherapy for head and neck malignancies. / Brown, Paul D.; Foote, Robert L.; McLaughlin, Mark P.; Halyard, Michele Y.; Ballman, Karla V.; Collie, A. Craig; Miller, Robert C.; Flemming, Kelly; Hallett, John W.

In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, Vol. 63, No. 5, 01.12.2005, p. 1361-1367.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, Paul D. ; Foote, Robert L. ; McLaughlin, Mark P. ; Halyard, Michele Y. ; Ballman, Karla V. ; Collie, A. Craig ; Miller, Robert C. ; Flemming, Kelly ; Hallett, John W. / A historical prospective cohort study of carotid artery stenosis after radiotherapy for head and neck malignancies. In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics. 2005 ; Vol. 63, No. 5. pp. 1361-1367.
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