A high-throughput denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography method for the identification of variant alleles associated with dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency

Hany Ezzeldin, Yoshihiro Okamoto, Martin R. Johnson, Robert B. Diasio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is the initial, rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolism of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). A pharmacogenetic syndrome has been described in which DPD-deficient patients are at risk for toxicity following administration of 5-FU. To date, there are at least 21 previously described mutations and/or polymorphisms that have been associated with DPD deficiency. In this study we describe the development of a highly specific, sensitive, inexpensive, and robust denaturing HPLC (DHPLC) method for rapidly identifying sequence variations (mutations and/or polymorphisms) in the gene (DPYD) that codes for the DPD enzyme. DHPLC conditions were optimized at three temperatures for analysis of the 23 exons of the DPYD gene using 25 amplicons representing the entire coding sequence, including all intron/exon boundaries (splice sites). Resolution of all 25 amplicons at the optimized temperature can be performed in 4.2 h. All 21 previously described sequence variations (mutations and/or polymorphisms) were prepared using site-directed mutagenesis from the wild-type DPYD gene, confirmed by sequence analysis, and subsequently resolved by DHPLC using the optimized conditions. These analyses generated reference chromatogram patterns for all known sequence variations previously encountered in DPD-deficient patients. In order to examine the utility and sensitivity of this approach, samples from patients with known sequence variations in the DPYD gene were analyzed. This DHPLC technique resolved 100% of the known DPYD sequence variations and differentiated between homozygous and heterozygous genotypes. We conclude that this DHPLC method is a highly specific and sensitive technique for rapidly detecting known sequence variations in the DPYD gene. In addition, this approach can be used to identify currently unrecognized unknown sequence variations in the DPYD gene and should be useful in future pharmacogenetic studies examining DPD deficiency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-73
Number of pages11
JournalAnalytical Biochemistry
Volume306
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2002

Keywords

  • DHPLC
  • DPD
  • DPYD
  • Mutations
  • Pharmacogenetics
  • Polymorphisms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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