A Drude model analysis of conductivity and free carriers in boron-doped diamond films and investigations of their internal stress and strain

Felicia S. Manciu, Marian Manciu, William G. Durrer, Jessica G. Salazar, Kendall H Lee, Kevin E. Bennet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Boron-doped diamond (BDD) has seen a substantial increase in interest for use as electrode coating material for electrochemistry and studies of deep brain stimulation mechanism. In this study, we present an alternative method for determining important characteristics, including conductivity, carrier concentration, and time constant, of such material by the signature of Drude-like metallic behavior in the far-infrared (IR) spectral range. Unlike the direct determination of conductivity from the four-point probe method, using far-IR transmittance provides additional information, such as whether the incorporation of boron results in a large concentration of carriers or in inducing defects in the diamond lattice. The slightly doped to medium-doped BDD samples that were produced using chemical vapor deposition and analyzed in this work show conductivities ranging between 5.5 and 11 (Ω cm)-1. Different growth conditions demonstrate that increasing boron concentration results in an increase in the carrier concentration, with values between 7.2 × 1016 and 2.5 × 1017 carriers/cm3. Addition of boron, besides leading to a decrease in the resistivity, also resulted in a decrease in the time constant, limiting BDD conductivity. Investigations, by confocal Raman mapping, of the induced stress in the material due to interaction with the substrate or to the amount of doping are also presented and discussed. The induced tensile stress, which was distributed closer to the film-substrate interface decreased slightly with doping.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5782-5789
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Materials Science
Volume49
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Boron
Diamond films
Residual stresses
Diamond
Diamonds
Carrier concentration
Doping (additives)
Infrared radiation
Electrochemistry
Substrates
Tensile stress
Chemical vapor deposition
Brain
Coatings
Defects
Electrodes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

A Drude model analysis of conductivity and free carriers in boron-doped diamond films and investigations of their internal stress and strain. / Manciu, Felicia S.; Manciu, Marian; Durrer, William G.; Salazar, Jessica G.; Lee, Kendall H; Bennet, Kevin E.

In: Journal of Materials Science, Vol. 49, No. 16, 2014, p. 5782-5789.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Manciu, Felicia S. ; Manciu, Marian ; Durrer, William G. ; Salazar, Jessica G. ; Lee, Kendall H ; Bennet, Kevin E. / A Drude model analysis of conductivity and free carriers in boron-doped diamond films and investigations of their internal stress and strain. In: Journal of Materials Science. 2014 ; Vol. 49, No. 16. pp. 5782-5789.
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