A disposable tear glucose biosensor - Part 2

System integration and model validation

Jeffrey T. La Belle, Daniel K. Bishop, Stephen R. Vossler, Dharmendra R. Patel, Curtiss B. Cook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We presented a concept for a tear glucose sensor system in an article by Bishop and colleagues in this issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology. A unique solution to collect tear fluid and measure glucose was developed. Individual components were selected, tested, and optimized, and system error modeling was performed. Further data on prototype testing are now provided. Methods: An integrated fluidics portion of the prototype was designed, cast, and tested. A sensor was created using screen-printed sensors integrated with a silicone rubber fluidics system and absorbent polyurethane foam. A simulated eye surface was prepared using fluid-saturated poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) sheets, and the disposable prototype was tested for both reproducibility at 0, 200, and 400 μM glucose (n = 7) and dynamic range of glucose detection from 0 to 1000 μM glucose. Results: From the replicated runs, an established relative standard deviation of 15.8% was calculated at 200 μM and a lower limit of detection was calculated at 43.4 μM. A linear dynamic range was demonstrated from 0 to 1000 μM with an R2 of 99.56%. The previously developed model predicted a 14.9% variation. This compares to the observed variance of 15.8% measured at 200 μM glucose. Conclusion: With the newly designed fluidics component, an integrated tear glucose prototype was assembled and tested. Testing of this integrated prototype demonstrated a satisfactory lower limit of detection for measuring glucose concentration in tears and was reproducible across a physiological sampling range. The next step in the device design process will be initial animal studies to evaluate the current prototype for factors such as eye irritation, ease of use, and correlation with blood glucose.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)307-311
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of diabetes science and technology
Volume4
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 2010

Fingerprint

Systems Integration
Biosensing Techniques
Tears
Biosensors
Glucose
Fluidics
Limit of Detection
Glucose sensors
Silicone Elastomers
Fluids
Equipment Design
Sensors
Testing
Medical problems
Blood Glucose
Silicones
Animals
Polyurethanes
Foams
Rubber

Keywords

  • Biosensor
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Glucose monitoring
  • Tear glucose monitoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

La Belle, J. T., Bishop, D. K., Vossler, S. R., Patel, D. R., & Cook, C. B. (2010). A disposable tear glucose biosensor - Part 2: System integration and model validation. Journal of diabetes science and technology, 4(2), 307-311.

A disposable tear glucose biosensor - Part 2 : System integration and model validation. / La Belle, Jeffrey T.; Bishop, Daniel K.; Vossler, Stephen R.; Patel, Dharmendra R.; Cook, Curtiss B.

In: Journal of diabetes science and technology, Vol. 4, No. 2, 03.2010, p. 307-311.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

La Belle, JT, Bishop, DK, Vossler, SR, Patel, DR & Cook, CB 2010, 'A disposable tear glucose biosensor - Part 2: System integration and model validation', Journal of diabetes science and technology, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 307-311.
La Belle, Jeffrey T. ; Bishop, Daniel K. ; Vossler, Stephen R. ; Patel, Dharmendra R. ; Cook, Curtiss B. / A disposable tear glucose biosensor - Part 2 : System integration and model validation. In: Journal of diabetes science and technology. 2010 ; Vol. 4, No. 2. pp. 307-311.
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