A diagnostic marker to discriminate childhood apraxia of speech from speech delay: I. development and description of the pause marker

Lawrence D. Shriberg, Edythe A. Strand, Marios Fourakis, Kathy J. Jakielski, Sheryl D. Hall, Heather B. Karlsson, Heather L. Mabie, Jane L. McSweeny, Christie M. Tilkens, David L. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: The goal of this article (PM I) is to describe the rationale for and development of the Pause Marker (PM), a single-sign diagnostic marker proposed to discriminate early or persistent childhood apraxia of speech from speech delay. Method: The authors describe and prioritize 7 criteria with which to evaluate the research and clinical utility of a diagnostic marker for childhood apraxia of speech, including evaluation of the present proposal. An overview is given of the Speech Disorders Classification System, including extensions completed in the same approximately 3-year period in which the PM was developed. Results: The finalized Speech Disorders Classification System includes a nosology and cross-classification procedures for childhood and persistent speech disorders and motor speech disorders (Shriberg, Strand, & Mabie, 2017). A PM is developed that provides procedural and scoring information, and citations to papers and technical reports that include audio exemplars of the PM and reference data used to standardize PM scores are provided. Conclusions: The PM described here is an acoustic-aided perceptual sign that quantifies one aspect of speech precision in the linguistic domain of phrasing. This diagnostic marker can be used to discriminate early or persistent childhood apraxia of speech from speech delay.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S1096-S1117
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume60
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

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