A Deep Learning Tool for Automated Radiographic Measurement of Acetabular Component Inclination and Version After Total Hip Arthroplasty

Pouria Rouzrokh, Cody C. Wyles, Kenneth A. Philbrick, Taghi Ramazanian, Alexander D. Weston, Jason C. Cai, Michael J. Taunton, David G. Lewallen, Daniel J. Berry, Bradley J. Erickson, Hilal Maradit Kremers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Inappropriate acetabular component angular position is believed to increase the risk of hip dislocation after total hip arthroplasty. However, manual measurement of these angles is time consuming and prone to interobserver variability. The purpose of this study was to develop a deep learning tool to automate the measurement of acetabular component angles on postoperative radiographs. Methods: Two cohorts of 600 anteroposterior (AP) pelvis and 600 cross-table lateral hip postoperative radiographs were used to develop deep learning models to segment the acetabular component and the ischial tuberosities. Cohorts were manually annotated, augmented, and randomly split to train-validation-test data sets on an 8:1:1 basis. Two U-Net convolutional neural network models (one for AP and one for cross-table lateral radiographs) were trained for 50 epochs. Image processing was then deployed to measure the acetabular component angles on the predicted masks for anatomical landmarks. Performance of the tool was tested on 80 AP and 80 cross-table lateral radiographs. Results: The convolutional neural network models achieved a mean Dice similarity coefficient of 0.878 and 0.903 on AP and cross-table lateral test data sets, respectively. The mean difference between human-level and machine-level measurements was 1.35° (σ = 1.07°) and 1.39° (σ = 1.27°) for the inclination and anteversion angles, respectively. Differences of 5⁰ or more between human-level and machine-level measurements were observed in less than 2.5% of cases. Conclusion: We developed a highly accurate deep learning tool to automate the measurement of angular position of acetabular components for use in both clinical and research settings. Level of Evidence: III.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Arthroplasty
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • acetabular component angle
  • anteversion angle
  • artificial intelligence
  • deep learning
  • inclination angle
  • total hip arthroplasty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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