A cross-sectional investigation of the suicidal spectrum: Typologies of suicidality based on ambivalence about living and dying

Stephen S. O'Connor, David A. Jobes, M. K. Yeargin, Matthew E. Fitzgerald, Vivian M. Rodríguez, Amy K. Conrad, Timothy W. Lineberry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the validity of assigning suicidal individuals into differing typologies of suicidality based on their reported wish to live and wish to die. Methods: One hundred five inpatients who reported suicidal ideation in the previous 48 hours completed a battery of assessments during inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. An algorithm was used to assign participants into 1 of 3 typologies of suicide: wish to live, ambivalent, or wish to die. Discriminant function analysis and group classification were used to predict group membership, followed by multiple analysis of variance and follow-up contrasts to measure between-group differences. Main Results: Group classification resulted in 76% accuracy for predicting typology of suicidality based on scores from suicide-specific measures. Self-perceived risk of suicide and hopelessness were the strongest variables at differentiating between the 3 groups. Patients in the wish to die typology were less likely to report having never made a suicide attempt. Conclusions: Creating typologies of suicidality may prove useful to clinicians seeking to better differentiate among suicidal patients within a limited period of assessment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)461-467
Number of pages7
JournalComprehensive Psychiatry
Volume53
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

O'Connor, S. S., Jobes, D. A., Yeargin, M. K., Fitzgerald, M. E., Rodríguez, V. M., Conrad, A. K., & Lineberry, T. W. (2012). A cross-sectional investigation of the suicidal spectrum: Typologies of suicidality based on ambivalence about living and dying. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 53(5), 461-467. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.comppsych.2011.09.007