A CNV-Distraction Paradigm in Combat Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Matthew Kimble, Kathryn J Ruddy, Patricia Deldin, Milissa Kaufman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fourteen veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and 14 without PTSD participated in a contingent negative variation (CNV)-distraction paradigm. Subjects were instructed to press a button after hearing a high-pitched tone (S2) preceded by a low-pitched tone (S1). One-half of the trials included a white-noise distracter placed in the S1-S2 interval. Posttraumatic stress disorder subjects had larger frontal, but smaller central and parietal CNVs, regardless of condition (distracter, no distracter) or epoch (early CNV, late CNV). In PTSD subjects, the N1/P2 complex was smaller to warning (S1) and distracter stimuli and did not show the extent of facilitation present in non-PTSD subjects. Findings highlight PTSD-related differences in phasic cortical excitability and attention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)102-108
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Contingent Negative Variation
Veterans
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Hearing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

A CNV-Distraction Paradigm in Combat Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. / Kimble, Matthew; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Deldin, Patricia; Kaufman, Milissa.

In: Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, Vol. 16, No. 1, 12.2004, p. 102-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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