3D localization of implanted radioactive sources in the prostate using trans-urethral ultrasound

David R. Holmes III, Brian J. Davis, Richard A. Robb

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men in the United States. Many techniques have been developed to diagnose and treat prostate cancer. 3D Trans-Urethral Ultrasound (TUUS) is a new technique for the diagnosis and treatment of prostate disease. This research focuses on the potential of TUUS for therapy-guidance during and after transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy (TIPPB). Computed tomography (CT) is currently used to determine the source locations and the effective radiation dose distribution throughout the tissue after the completion of the procedure. TUUS may be a viable alternative to CT for determining source locations within the prostate. Placement of the TUUS catheter into the urethra provides excellent 2D images of the prostate. In addition, the catheter can be used to acquire 3D volumetric data for 3D analysis of the prostate, associated tissue, and radioactive sources. Initial work on source localization was conducted on an ultrasound-equivalent prostate phantom. Cylindrical dummy radiation sources with diameter of.8 mm and length of 4.5 mm were placed into the prostate phantom for assessment with TUUS. The TUUS imaging device is a lOfr catheter with a linear array of ultrasonic crystals at one end. The ultrasound catheter operates at 10MHz and is controlled by the Acuson Sequoia ultrasound workstation. The catheter was placed in the phantom urethra and 3D scans were acquired. A corresponding CT was acquired for comparative purposes. Segmentation of the prostate capsule was done semi- automatically. Dummy radiation seed segmentation was conducted manually. Additional processing was necessary to account for image artifact and correctly reconstruct the seeds. The prostate shell and radioactive source reconstructions provide an excellent 3D representation. Comparison to the CT data suggests that the TUUS data provided: 1) greater resolution and 2) better soft tissue differentiation. The reconstructed sources were measured and corresponded to the physical dimensions of those placed in the phantoms. The method is now being evaluated on cadavers and patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationStudies in Health Technology and Informatics
Pages199-205
Number of pages7
Volume81
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Event2001 Medicine Meets Virtual Reality Conference: Outer Space, Inner Space, Virtual Space, MMVR 2001 - Newport Beach, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 24 2001Jan 27 2001

Other

Other2001 Medicine Meets Virtual Reality Conference: Outer Space, Inner Space, Virtual Space, MMVR 2001
CountryUnited States
CityNewport Beach, CA
Period1/24/011/27/01

Fingerprint

Prostate
Ultrasonics
Catheters
Tomography
Urethra
Radiation
Tissue
Prostatic Neoplasms
Seeds
Sequoia
Seed
Urinary Catheters
Brachytherapy
Tissue Distribution
Cadaver
Artifacts
Capsules
Ultrasonography
Dosimetry
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

Cite this

Holmes III, D. R., Davis, B. J., & Robb, R. A. (2001). 3D localization of implanted radioactive sources in the prostate using trans-urethral ultrasound. In Studies in Health Technology and Informatics (Vol. 81, pp. 199-205) https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-60750-925-7-199

3D localization of implanted radioactive sources in the prostate using trans-urethral ultrasound. / Holmes III, David R.; Davis, Brian J.; Robb, Richard A.

Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 81 2001. p. 199-205.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Holmes III, DR, Davis, BJ & Robb, RA 2001, 3D localization of implanted radioactive sources in the prostate using trans-urethral ultrasound. in Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. vol. 81, pp. 199-205, 2001 Medicine Meets Virtual Reality Conference: Outer Space, Inner Space, Virtual Space, MMVR 2001, Newport Beach, CA, United States, 1/24/01. https://doi.org/10.3233/978-1-60750-925-7-199
Holmes III, David R. ; Davis, Brian J. ; Robb, Richard A. / 3D localization of implanted radioactive sources in the prostate using trans-urethral ultrasound. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. Vol. 81 2001. pp. 199-205
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