3-T Imaging of the Cochlear Nerve and Labyrinth in Cochlear-Implant Candidates: 3D Fast Recovery Fast Spin-Echo versus 3D Constructive Interference in the Steady State Techniques

John I. Lane, Heidi Ward, Robert J. Witte, Matt A. Bernstein, Colin L.W. Driscoll

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

66 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: High-resolution imaging of the internal auditory canal and labyrinth at 1.5 T is often performed by using three-dimensional (3D) fast spin-echo or T2* techniques. We evaluated both techniques at 3 T in the preoperative assessment of patients being considered for cochlear implants. METHODS: Sagittal 3D fast recovery fast spin-echo (FRFSE) and 3D constructive interference in the steady state (CISS) images were acquired in eight patients at 3.0 T by using dual surface coils. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) for the intracanalicular nerve and CSF were measured in the internal auditory canal. Two neuroradiologists reviewed the images to determine whether the techniques provided images of diagnostic quality. RESULTS: CNRs for 3D CISS were twice those obtained with 3D FRFSE. Both techniques provided images of diagnostic quality, though spurious signal intensity loss at the apex of the superior semicircular canals was encountered on 3D FRFSE images in four of eight patients. CONCLUSION: Both 3D FRFSE and 3D CISS provide high-resolution images of the internal auditory canal and labyrinth at 3.0 T. We predict that the superior CNRs obtained with 3D CISS will prove advantageous as we move to smaller fields of view at higher field strength.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)618-622
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume25
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

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