STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION BY NON-INVASIVE VIVISECTION

  • Ritman, Erik L, (PI)
  • Rumberger, J. (PI)
  • Rehder, K.A.I. (PI)
  • Rumberger, J. (PI)
  • Rodarte, Joseph (PI)
  • Rehder, K.A.I. (PI)
  • Mair, Douglas (PI)
  • Robb, Richard (PI)
  • Bove, Alfred (PI)

Project: Research project

Description

The basic hypothesis of this Program is that structure-to-function
interrelationships in the undisturbed, in situ, organs may differ
significantly from that seen in isolated, or disturbed in situ, organs
because of the mechanical interaction between the organ and its contiguous
organs and/or neurohumoral integration with the body as a whole. The overall objective is to quantitate pathophysiological aspects of
structure-to-function relationships in the in situ heart, lungs,
thoracoabdominal wall and kidneys with increased accuracy and less invasion
than is possible by conventional methods. The unique and central
integrating feature of this program is the use of the Dynamic Spatial
Reconstructor (DSR), a high speed x-ray CT scanner, which will enable us to
make these quantitations with minimal invasion in experimental animals and
in man. Four of the eight research projects in the program involve human subjects.
In Project III we will study the role of the thoracoabdominal wall and body
orientation on lung function in normal awake and anesthetized volunteers,
in Project V we will quantitate coronary artery anatomy and in VI
myocardial perfusion in patients with coronary artery disease. In Project
I patients with peri and paracardial diseases will be studied so that the
mechanical role of heart lung interaction in maintaining constant total
heart volume can be quantitated. There are also six projects which involve
study of dogs' coronary arterial anatomy (V), myocardial mechanical
efficiency (IV), myocardial hypertrophy (VIII), heart lung interaction (I),
thoracic wall to lung interaction (II) or renal perfusion (VII). These
projects are supported by three cores, Core A supports the DSR scanner
facility, Core B supports the computer based image data reconstruction and
analysis needs and Core C provides the administrative support. The DSR will supply the desired data with: (1) Less invasion (less
radiation, less contrast medium injected, no need to open the thoracic or
abdominal cavity) than by conventional techniques providing comparable
accuracy; (2) Greater accuracy and/or less ambiguity than occurs in
conventional projection imaging techniques such as cine angiography or
gamma camera imaging because it is a tomographic 3-D imaging technique; (3)
A basis for comparison with other tomographic imaging techniques -
specifically sector echocardiograms in Project VIII and Magnetic Resonance
Images in Project I. The outcome of these projects could have direct impact on our understanding
of the in situ pathophysiology of disease processes and the response to
medical treatment.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date1/1/736/30/91

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health

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Lung
Vivisection
Anatomy
Perfusion
Thoracic Cavity
Kidney
Equipment and Supplies
Computer-Assisted Image Processing
Three-Dimensional Imaging
Cardiomegaly
Thoracic Wall
Contrast Media
Coronary Artery Disease
Volunteers
Coronary Vessels
Angiography
X-Rays
Dogs
Research
Tomography

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)