SPECIALIZED PROGRAM OF RESEARCH EXCELLENCE/LUNG CANCER

  • Petersen, Gloria M (PI)
  • Goodman, Steven N. (PI)
  • Herman, James G. (PI)
  • Lechner, John F. (PI)
  • Casero, Robert (PI)
  • Tockman, Melvyn (PI)
  • Sidransky, David (PI)
  • Penno, Margaret (PI)
  • Piantadosi, Steven (PI)
  • Gabrielson, Edward W. (PI)
  • Baylin, Stephen (PI)
  • Lechner, John F. (PI)
  • Casero, Robert (PI)
  • Sidransky, David (PI)
  • Penno, Margaret (PI)
  • Goodman, Steven N. (PI)
  • Gabrielson, Edward W. (PI)
  • Herman, James G. (PI)
  • Biswal, Shyam (PI)
  • Belinsky, Steven (PI)
  • Baylin, Stephen (PI)
  • Goodman, Steven N. (PI)
  • Herman, James G. (PI)

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

The Johns Hopkins SPORE program for lung cancer, functioning as a major
element of the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Cancer Center, would represent
a multidisciplinary and highly collaborative translational research effort
to develop new strategies for early detection, prevention and treatment of
lung cancer. Included will be an emphasis upon enhancing entry of new
investigators into careers in lung cancer research -- and encouragement of
novel research approaches through funding of pilot projects. The work
scope of the SPORE addresses most of the research imperatives defined at
the 1991 Annapolis Lung Cancer Workshop. A major emphasis is devoted to
defining, at a molecular level, the earliest steps in lung cancer
evolution. The goal is to develop markers which will be tested for
efficacy in predicting and/or detecting early lung cancer and which will
serve as new tools for guiding prevention and early treatment strategies.
Unique tissue acquisition efforts of a Core Tissue Resource will allow
isolated fresh and cultured human bronchial epithelium to be studied for
timing of genetic (allelic losses, gene mutations) and epigenetic (changes
in DNA methylation, neuroendocrine differentiation, signal transduction
events, monoclonal antibody recognition) abnormalities in lung cancer
progression. The research will include studies of unique patient cohorts
for lung cancer risk, including uranium miners and individuals at genetic
risk, and studies of unique rodent models for lung cancer induction. Novel
treatment strategies for lung cancer, based on molecular targets defined in
the laboratory, will be evaluated in focused clinical trials. Included
will be molecular biology and biochemical assays to predict and monitor
responses. Novel polyamine analogues active, through a newly defined gene
induction event, against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) will receive an
initial clinical trial. The observation that retinoids can block a tumor
progression step for small cell lung cancer cells, in a laboratory model,
will be translated into a clinical trial to prevent, or delay, drug
resistance for this cancer. In summary, this SPORE program represents an
exciting collaborative opportunity for basic and clinical investigators to
translate understanding of fundamental biology into new means to prevent,
detect and treat lung cancer.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date9/30/9211/30/15

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)

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