MEASLES IMMUNITY IN TWO POPULATIONS

  • Poland, Gregory A (PI)

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

Despite the U.S. Public Health Service's goal of eradicating measles by
1982, measles remains a prominent public health concern with over 27,600
cases reported in 1990. Especially troubling is the fact that 20% - 40%
of these cases occurred among persons who had been appropriately
immunized. While there is some information available about vaccine
coverage in the population, there are surprisingly few data available
about the seroprevalence of immunity to measles. This proposed study
will serve to fill many of the gaps in our knowledge about the community
prevalence of immunity to measles. This study will collect data from two
North American populations which have enjoyed nearly 100 percent vaccine
coverage for the past decade. Drawing on samples from the two
populations, this study will provide estimates of the prevalence of
measles immunity in the Grenfell region of Newfoundland, Canada and
Olmsted County, Minnesota for persons of all ages. This study will take
advantage of a "natural" experiment by comparing the community impact of
immunizing children against measles at 15 months of age (Olmsted County)
as compared to 12 months (Newfoundland). These estimates will be refined
for children aged 7 to 11 years in these two communities who would have
received only the reformulated (post-1980) measles vaccine. Estimates
of the seroprevalence of vaccine-induced immunity to measles among these
children will be calculated based upon probability samples derived from
school records in these two communities. The relationship between age
at immunization and subsequent immunity will be assessed at the community
level (comparing policy) and at the individual level (comparing actual
age at immunization). Antibody measurements will be done using ELISA
methodology. Finally, this study will prospectively measure the
immunologic effect of re-vaccination among persons with vaccine failure
(either primary or secondary). Using a nested case-control design then,
this study will serve to generate hypotheses to explain why persons fail
to mount appropriate immune responses following re-vaccination. In
summary, this study will provide fundamental information about the
seroprevalence of immunity to measles at the community level as well as
important insights into the relationships between timing of immunization,
subsequent immunity, and immunization failure. These data are important
in formulating national policy to eliminate measles.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date9/30/933/30/18

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health: $333,210.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $252,875.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $333,210.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $252,875.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $445,159.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $246,933.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $197,555.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $339,975.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $252,875.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $438,947.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $449,096.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $336,575.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $339,975.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $394,975.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $252,875.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $203,481.00

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

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