EPIDEMIOLOGY AND GENETICS OF PARKINSON'S DISEASE

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

DESCRIPTION (Adapted from applicant's abstract): Parkinson's disease (PD) is a
common and disabling condition in the expanding elderly population of the US
and worldwide. Its etiology remains unknown and both genetic and environmental
factors have been suspected. The long-term goal of the proposed studies based
in different sampling is to clarify the etiology of PD and to identify means to
prevent it. Three independent but related studies based on different sampling
and measurement strategies are proposed. The hypotheses tested derive directly
from our current work and preliminary findings. A case control study will
include 800 cases of PD referred to the Mayo clinic from a 120 mile radius or
from a 5 state region and 800 controls free pf PD and parkinsonism matched by
age (+ 2 years), sex and region of residence. Controls from the general
population will be identified from health care financial administration lists
for cases aged 65 years or above and through random digit dialing for cases
below 65 years. Exposures will be accessed through direct telephone interview,
and will include tobacco, coffee, and alcohol use; markers of novelty seeking
behavior; and, for women, use of estrogen replacement therapy after menopause
and other reproductive and estrogen related factors. A first historical cohort
study will test the association between unilateral and bilateral oophorectomy
before menopause and PD in an established population based cohort. The study
will include 2,533 women who underwent oophorectomy in 1950-1987 while residing
in Olmsted County, MN and 2,533 women of the same age and residence who did not
undergo oophorectomy. A second historical study will test the association
between personality traits measured by the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality
Inventory (MMPI) and PD in an established research cohort. This study will
include 8,775 persons who underwent MMPI testing in 1962-1965 while residing in
Minnesota. The proposed case-control study is strong because it has adequate
statistical power to confirm our preliminary findings on the role of estrogen
in PD and to explore the link between substance use and novelty seeking
behaviors in PD. All interviews with case and controls will be direct, the
proposed oophorectomy cohort study is strong because of its cohort design, its
population-based sampling, its adequate statistical power, and because of the
expected high rate of follow-up through both passive and active strategies. The
proposed MMPI cohort study is strong because of its cohort design, its adequate
statistical power and because of our extensive experience with tracing and
interviewing individuals. These three studies will contribute greatly to
understanding the causes and possible prevention of PD by exploring novel
hypotheses and by using innovative methods.
StatusNot started

Funding

  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: $921,854.00
  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: $885,733.00
  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: $390,799.00
  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: $905,968.00
  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: $871,620.00
  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: $898,020.00
  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

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