2019 Neuroethology Gordon Research Conference and Gordon Research Seminar, July 28-August 2, 2019; Mount Snow, West Dover, Vermont

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

The Gordon Research Conference on Neuroethology, and a preceding 2-day graduate student/postdoc-led Gordon Research Seminar on the same topic will be held from July 28-August 2, 2019 in West Dover, VT. Neuroethology composes areas of neuroscience that aim to understand how nervous systems integrate sensory cues and innate imperatives to produce complex behaviors in natural environments. The shared goal of neuroethology is to reconcile the observed diversity of natural behavior with underlying common principles of neural development, neural organization and function. This symposium presents a unique opportunity to promote dialogue and exchange of ideas among investigators who work on different aspects of neuroethology. This year's theme is to study how sensory inputs across multiple dimensions, e.g. visual, mechanical, olfactory are combined to modulate brain circuit activity during complex, naturalistic behaviors. All speakers are expert investigators in their fields. An expected outcome of the symposium is the development of new collaborations that will lead to novel work on fundamental questions about higher brain functions that underlie natural complex behavior.

The Gordon Research Conference on Neuroethology, and a preceding 2-day graduate student/postdoc-led Gordon Research Seminar on the same topic will be held from July 28-August 2, 2019 in West Dover, VT. This recurring conference brings together researchers working to understand the common principles of neural development, organization and computation that underlie the diversity of natural behavior. The theme of this year's meeting is the study of multisensory or state-dependent modulation of neural circuits during complex behaviors. The program assembles a broad multidisciplinary group of experts and their trainees to discuss new approaches and emergent findings. Sessions include the study of higher brain functions that underlie complex behavior; optogenetic interrogation of neural circuits; multisensory integration and neurogenetics. All speakers are expert investigators in their fields. An expected outcome of the symposium is the development of new collaborations that will lead to novel work on fundamental questions about how neural circuit function and behavior respond and adapt to natural environmental conditions.

This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

StatusFinished
Effective start/end date6/1/195/31/20

Funding

  • National Science Foundation: $11,755.00

Fingerprint

Explore the research topics touched on by this project. These labels are generated based on the underlying awards/grants. Together they form a unique fingerprint.